Bamah

Bamah

(bā`mə) [Heb.,=high place], term elsewhere translated in most English editions of the Bible, but in one passage in the Book of Ezekiel it is given in the original. The word is translated earlier in the same verse. There is a pun on the verb "to go" that had in Hebrew a sound much like the word Bamah.
References in periodicals archive ?
2]O observed at the active vegetative (28-42 DAS) and panicle initiation (56-70 DAS) stages are in agreement with the findings of Gogoi and Bamah (2012) and Borah and Baruah (2016) in wheat.
Zwickel identifica estos santuarios con la bamah o los bamot que aparecen una y otra vez en la literatura biblica relativa al periodo pre y monarquico, que eran ermitas en altozanos dedicados a divinidades representadas con estelas de madera o robles frondosos.
Myanmar is a complex set of cultures and that of the ethnic majority Burman, or Bamah, people has proven ascendant over more than a millennium.
The statement said, "if the Bamah Tatmadaw does not stop its transgression and military offensives in Kachin State by June 10, 2012, UNFC members, who have agreed ceasefire with U Thein Sein government, have decided to review the peace process and future programs, including the preliminary ceasefire agreements reached,".
25) Leopold Jessner, "Of the Eretz-Israeli Theatre and Its Purpose" (Hebrew), Bamah, May 1934, 3 (italics in original).
Bamah is usually translated by [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], "heights," indicating consensus about its general nature, but it also receives six other renditions including [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
I was surprised to learn that in Israeli Hebrew bamah is used for any stage, including the theaters used for performing arts.
To seek archaeological evidence for the destruction of bamot, it is necessary first to know what a bamah is and second where one might be found.
The bamah may be a place where YHWH can be found and where he may be worshipped.
12) In the LXX, [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is sometimes used to translate mizbeah, "altar," so that the same word renders both bamah and mizbeah.
A bamah has been viewed on the one hand as a natural high place or peak, [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], and on the other as a constructed platform for an altar, or the altar itself, [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
Walter Burkert re-examines two Hebrew-Greek etymological connections in the domain of cultic architecture: bamah and ?