Bamah

Bamah

(bā`mə) [Heb.,=high place], term elsewhere translated in most English editions of the Bible, but in one passage in the Book of Ezekiel it is given in the original. The word is translated earlier in the same verse. There is a pun on the verb "to go" that had in Hebrew a sound much like the word Bamah.
References in periodicals archive ?
I was surprised to learn that in Israeli Hebrew bamah is used for any stage, including the theaters used for performing arts.
25) Leopold Jessner, "Of the Eretz-Israeli Theatre and Its Purpose" (Hebrew), Bamah, May 1934, 3 (italics in original).
Bamah is usually translated by [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], "heights," indicating consensus about its general nature, but it also receives six other renditions including [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
To seek archaeological evidence for the destruction of bamot, it is necessary first to know what a bamah is and second where one might be found.
The bamah may be a place where YHWH can be found and where he may be worshipped.
12) In the LXX, [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is sometimes used to translate mizbeah, "altar," so that the same word renders both bamah and mizbeah.
A bamah has been viewed on the one hand as a natural high place or peak, [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], and on the other as a constructed platform for an altar, or the altar itself, [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
14) Haran defines bamah as an open-air altar or platform, although he recognizes other open-air altars that he does not call bamot.
1 Samuel 9 provides the only description of a bamah in the Biblical text.
Th e great bamah where Solomon worshipped was associated with the town of Gibeon (1 Kings 3:5; 2 Chron.
The bamah created by Jeroboam at Bethel was associated with the city (1 Kings 12:29).
Walter Burkert re-examines two Hebrew-Greek etymological connections in the domain of cultic architecture: bamah and ?