Bandage


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bandage

[′ban·dij]
(building construction)
A strap, band, ring, or chain placed around a structure to secure and hold its parts together, as around the springing of a dome.
(electricity)
Rubber ribbon about 4 inches (10 centimeters) wide for temporarily protecting a telephone or coaxial splice from moisture.
(medicine)
A strip of gauze, muslin, flannel, or other material, usually in the form of a roll, but sometimes triangular or tailed, used to hold dressing in place, to apply pressure, to immobilize a part, to support a dependent or injured part, to obliterate tissue cavities, or to check hemorrhage.

Bandage

 

a soft or rigid material used to secure a dressing on a wound (protective bandage), create pressure on a part of the body to halt venous bleeding (pressure bandage), or keep an injured part of the body, usually an extremity, in the necessary position (immobilizing bandage).

Protective and pressure bandages are usually applied from a roll of gauze over a sterile dressing of gauze or cotton placed on a wound. Several types of protective bandages can be used, depending on the topography of the part of the body to be bandaged. Examples are circular, figure-of-8, and spica bandages. Cleol (a composite of rosin, ethyl alcohol, ether, and sunflower oil) and adhesive bandages can also be used to secure a dressing. An immobilizing bandage is ordinarily used for a fracture or extensive injury to soft tissue and can be made of wood, wire, or plastic. Such a bandage is called a splint, and the procedure for applying it splinting. The application of bandages is a first-aid procedure.

Inflatable coverings—pneumatic splints that uniformly encircle and immobilize the body—are used for prolonged and difficult transport of a victim (for example, from a mine) and for the immobilization of the extremities or the entire body. Plaster casts are commonly used for fractures.

V. F. POZHARISKII

What does it mean when you dream about a bandage?

The sense of being hurt, either physically or emotionally. It can also represent the sense of healing.

bandage

A strap, band, ring, or chain placed around a structure to secure and hold its parts together, as around the springing of a dome.
References in classic literature ?
Avoiding its strokes they busied themselves with the anointed bandage.
The young woman with the flannel bandage waited, and dropped everything on the table wherever it happened to go, and never moved it again until she put it on the stairs.
The beast bad been handicapped but little by his splinted leg; but having eaten he lay down and com-menced to gnaw at the bandage.
Virginia had at last succeeded in adjusting her rude bandage and stopping the flow of blood.
She dressed his wound deftly and adjusted a bandage around his head.
Now, the young lady happened to be lame, and had to have her foot bandaged up every day; so she kept a basketful of bandages, all nicely rolled and ready.
He too was aroused from his studies by a tawny naked arm round his throat, by a bandage over his eyes, and by a gag in his mouth.
They were allowed to rest a moment, every little while; they got other rests by wounding each other, for then they could sit down while the doctor applied the lint and bandages.
After dressing the unfortunate man's wounds, I readjusted the bandages on his head, and turned to Captain Nemo.
The appearance of the infant, however, while in this state of compression, is whimsically hideous, and "its little black eyes," we are told, "being forced out by the tightness of the bandages, resemble those of a mouse choked in a trap.
There was a lecture from nine till ten, when he went into the wards; there wounds had to be dressed, stitches taken out, bandages renewed: Philip prided himself a little on his skill in bandaging, and it amused him to wring a word of approval from a nurse.
Next day, however, she was awfully tender, and gave out bandages to every one, and they played till bed-time at limping about and carrying their arms in slings.