Banded Mongoose


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Banded Mongoose

 

(Mungos mungo), a predatory mammal of the family Viverridae. The body length measures 30–45 cm, and the tail length, 23–29 cm. The banded mongoose is short-legged. Its coarse hair is brownish gray with alternating light and dark transverse bands. The banded mongoose is found throughout Africa south of the Sahara. It lives in groups along the banks of rivers and in thorn thickets. It builds no burrow or nest of its own but takes up temporary quarters in any shelter that it finds convenient. The banded mongoose feeds on insects and their larvae, on small rodents, on lizards, and on snakes. Occasionally, the generic name Mungo is applied to another genus of Viverridae, Herpestes.

References in periodicals archive ?
mungi usually kills infected banded mongoose within two to three months after symptoms develop, with outbreaks occurring in a largely seasonal pattern.
mungi threatens the survival of smaller social groups or troops of banded mongoose in the study area.
Banded mongooses feed on a wide range of prey species, including prey items with hard shells, such as bird eggs or rhinoceros beetles.
A subculture of an isolate from banded mongoose No.
LaGrange for their assistance in monitoring banded mongoose troops during this study.
We describe outbreaks of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a human pathogen, in free-ranging banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) in Botswana and suricates (Suricats suricatta) in South Africa.
An epizootic affecting banded mongooses (Mungos mungo) was first identified at the northern extreme of Chobe National Park along the Chobe River in the dry season, from June 13 to September 15, 1999 (S 17[degrees] 49.
Fatal cowpox virus infection in captive banded mongooses (Mungos mungo).
Banded mongooses are social, fossorial, viverids that feed on invertebrates and small mammals including subterranean species (1).
mungi appears to infect banded mongooses by means of a nonrespiratory route through the nasal planum, suggestive of environmental transmission.
But, peaceful group living among female banded mongooses falls apart when dominant, older females decide to kick subordinates out.
He and his team documented the behavior while studying 1400 banded mongooses living in 20 groups in and around Mweya Peninsula, Uganda.