Bangorian Controversy


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Bangorian Controversy

(băng-gô`rēən), religious dispute in the Church of England during the early part of the reign of George I. Benjamin HoadlyHoadly, Benjamin
, 1676–1761, English prelate, center of the Bangorian Controversy within the Church of England. He was a leader in the Low Church group. In 1715 he was appointed bishop of Bangor, Wales, and chaplain to George I.
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, bishop of Bangor, Wales, delivered a sermon (1717) before the king in which he denied that the church had any doctrinal or disciplinary authority. Advocates of ecclesiastical authority (among them William LawLaw, William,
1686–1761, English clergyman, noted for his controversial, devotional, and mystical writings. One of the nonjurors, Law was deprived of his fellowship in Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and lost all chances for advancement in the church.
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) attacked Hoadly's position, and a sharp controversy ensued, in which some 50 writers participated and about 200 pamphlets were issued. Attacks on Hoadly in convocation, the church assembly, led the king to suspend that body in 1717; it was not allowed to meet again until 1852.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Church of England and the Bangorian Controversy, 1716-1721.
Benjamin Hoadly, the Low Church clergyman and later author of the Bangorian controversy, was outraged by the iniquitous treatment of Emlyn who seemed beset by universal intolerance.
In 1717 he published The Convocation , a poem about a religious dispute known as the Bangorian controversy, and in 1718 Love in a Veil (1719), a comedy he adapted from the Spanish of Pedro Calderon de la Barca, was produced at Drury Lane.