lesion

(redirected from Bankart lesion)
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Related to Bankart lesion: Slap lesion

lesion

any structural change in a bodily part resulting from injury or disease

lesion

[′lē·zhən]
(biology)
A structural or functional alteration due to injury or disease.
(cell and molecular biology)
A damaged site in a gene, chromosome, or protein molecule.
References in periodicals archive ?
Suture material in the form of #1 PDS is passed through the soft tissue of the Bankart lesion and glenoid bone from anterior to posterior with a modified Beath pin.
Two additional Suretac devices were then used to repair the Bankart lesion.
33,34) CT has also been shown to be useful for the assessment of bony Bankart lesions and the evaluation of bone quality and quantity.
Arthroscopic transglenoid suture of Bankart lesions.
In addition, 10% of patients had associated SLAP lesions while another 10% had Bankart lesions, all of which were associated with rotator cuff fraying.
Bencardino and colleagues (24) found that SLAP lesions were associated with partial rotator cuff tears in 42% of patients, frayed or lax inferior glenohumeral ligaments in 26%, Bankart lesions in 16%, Hill-Sachs lesions in 16%, chondral lesions in 16%, loose bodies in 10%, complete rotator cuff tears in 5%, and posterior labral tears in 5%.
Risk factors for failed arthroscopic stabilization included males under 18 years of age, collision athletes, bone deficiencies on the glenoid, the absence of a Bankart lesion, an attenuated IGHL complex, rotator interval lesions, and short immobilization periods.
Patients with unidirectional, traumatic anterior instability, with a discrete Bankart lesion and with well developed glenohumeral ligaments, who do not participate in collision athletics, are ideal for an arthroscopic procedure.
Bankart lesions are caused by the collision of the humeral head with the anteroinferior glenoid during forceful abduction, extension and external rotation of the humerus.
Posterior labral tears and reverse Bankart lesions will demonstrate similar findings as their anterior counterparts, except they occur at the posterior glenoid rim.
These factors could include the size and position of the Bankart lesions and/or Hills Sachs lesion.