banker

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Related to Bankers: Investment bankers

banker

1
1. an official or player in charge of the bank in any of various games, esp gambling games
2. a result that has been forecast identically in a series of entries on a football pool coupon

banker

2
1. a fishing vessel of Newfoundland
2. a fisherman in such a vessel
3. Brit a locomotive that is used to help a heavy train up a steep gradient

banker

3
a craftsman's workbench

banker

[′baŋ·kər]
(engineering)
The bench or table upon which bricklayers and stonemasons prepare and shape their material.

banker

The bench or table upon which bricklayers and stonemasons prepare and shape their material.
References in classic literature ?
The elderly and lethargic banker sprang erect in the coach and leapt over the precipice before the tilted vehicle could take him there.
The banker looked at him under lowering brows, red-faced and sulky, but seemingly cowed.
As four of you left the room, you and Miss Harrogate went ahead, talking and laughing; the banker and the courier came behind, speaking sparely and rather low.
I won't have it," said the banker in a choking voice; "I command you not to interfere.
There was a momentary silence, broken in an extraordinary way by the banker, who cried out in a hoarse and strangled voice: "Robbed
The great banker nodded with an odd air of business assent, seemed to reflect a moment, and before they could interpose took a half turn and a step that brought him to the edge of the outer mountain wall.
Laquidara, senior vice president & Chief Mortgage Officer has just been awarded the prestigious designation of Certified Mortgage Banker (CMB) by the Society of Mortgage Bankers and Campus MBA of The Mortgage Bankers Association in Washington, DC.
Looking back at three-quarters of a century in central bank cooperation provided a fitting opportunity for the BIS leaders to demonstrate that central bankers are learning to open up and be more responsive to a skeptical public and to the financial community at large.
In making these allocations, taxpayers are required to conduct a detailed analysis of the various activities the investment bankers performed and to gather supporting records.
In 2001, Charlene Nelson, a stout believer in the Fourth Amendment, learned that a cabal of bankers, legislators, and the governor of her state of North Dakota were trying to undo a good state "opt-in" law requiring banks to get permission before selling their customer's financial data.
It is with the Virginia Bankers Association, which stepped up its efforts to help member banks sell insurance after Congress enacted in 1999 the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Financial Services Modernization Act.