banner ad

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banner ad

A graphic image used on websites to advertise a product or service. Banner ads, or simply "banners," are rectangles typically 468 pixels wide by 60 pixels high. They also come in other common sizes, including 460x60, 460x55 and 392x72. A much larger horizontal ad image called the "leaderboard" is 728x90, while "skyscraper ads" are narrow and vertically oriented, typically 120x600 and 160x600. See trick banner, dynamic rotation, interstitial ad, Shoshkele, SUPERSTITIAL, meta ad and impression.


CLC's Banner Ad
This 468x60 pixel image is an earlier banner ad for this encyclopedia from The Computer Language Company.
References in periodicals archive ?
One thing that is apparent is that disclosures are ubiquitous to banner ads.
Premier League has begun an online banner ad campaign that is intended to promote the launch of its new web site.
Monsanto also has utilized banner ads on DTN's AgDayta.
Additionally, 84% of respondents said pop-up ads interfere with their reading or using a Web page, compared to 54% who said banner ads interfere with their Web usage.
The predominant form of web advertising is banner ads (IAB, 1999b).
Probably the best research on this topic is a white paper called "The Five Golden Rules of Online Branding," whose three authors analyzed more than 600 banner ads across 11 industries to find common components that make some ads rise above the noise level.
My philosophy is not to deluge my customers with banner ads or other blatant sales gimmicks.
Advertisements - Banner ads are often bandwidth-intensive and a major distraction for employees.
Another method used to sell banner ads is based on paying for how many people clicked through from the banner ad to your site.
CyberCash Inc and NetGravity Inc have come up with a rather ingenious way to turn web banner ads into individual points of sale.
RICH MEDIA BOOSTS SAGGING CLICKTHROUGHS AND TURNS BANNER ADS INTO A TRUE RESPONSE CHANNEL
With a banner ad exchange program, participants essentially swap banner ads.