Banovina


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Banovina

 

an administrative and territorial unit of the former kingdom of Yugoslavia, created by the Constitution of 1931. Yugoslavia was divided into nine banovine (instead of the 33 old župas (or districts). A banovina was headed by a ban (king’s representative). The banovine were abolished after the adoption of the Constitution of 1946.

References in periodicals archive ?
Contract award notice: implementation of the investigations and surveying drafting project basis, the study of the need for environmental impact assessment, the main project for obtaining a building permit, detailed design, surveying projects, the plan works and the tender for the reconstruction of the embankment in the protected area of banovina, the shares in which are implemented in active flood
Orthodox and Catholics in the mixed Croat-Serb area of Banovina,
5) In the August of 1995, military-police operation Storm has been carried out, liberating areas of northern Dalmatia, southern and eastern Lika, as well as Kordun and Banovina.
Serbs would perhaps propose the name Vardar Macedonia, or Banovina wheareas Albanians are categorically against any option using a Slavic term.
When the Serbian and Croatian political elites agreed to change the constitution of the Kingdom of Yugoslavia and to form the Banovina of Croatia, the Croatian soccer officials stated that they wanted to reorganize the JNS on the same, national principle.
Ironically, the new leaders of the Croat banovina instantly forgot their opposition to Serbian nationalizing policies after 1918 and acted the same way on a smaller scale, antagonizing the Serb minority.
Invitation to tender: implementation of the investigations and surveying the work on project basis, the study of the need for environmental impact assessment, the main project for obtaining a building permit, detailed design, surveying projects, plan works and the tender for the reconstruction of the embankment in the protected area of banovina, the shares in which are implemented in active flood
The Catholic Croats and Slovenes were wondering what the outcome of World War II would mean for them; "the aspiration"--the NCWC press release asserted--"of the people of Croatia and the Provinces of Bosnia, Herzegovina, Slavonia, Srem, Dalmatia, Banovina, and Istria-all historically and ethnologically a part of the original Croatia--is a free and sovereign State.