Bao Dai

Bao Dai

(bou dī), 1913–97, emperor of Annam (1926–45) and chief of state of Vietnam (1949–55). Born Prince Nguyen Vinh Thuy, he was the son of Emperor Khai Din and succeeded to the throne in 1926, but did not occupy it until 1932. Bao Dai cooperated with both the Vichy French and Japanese during World War II, but in 1945 the Viet Minh nationalists under HoHo Chi Minh
, 1890–1969, Vietnamese nationalist leader, president of North Vietnam (1954–69), and one of the most influential political leaders of the 20th cent. His given name was Nguyen That Thanh. In 1911 he left Vietnam, working aboard a French liner.
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 Chi Minh forced his resignation. The emperor returned in 1949 as head of the new state of Vietnam, which included Annam plus Tonkin and Cochin China. After Vietnam's partition (1954) he accepted Ngo Dinh DiemDiem, Ngo Dinh
, 1901–63, president of South Vietnam (1955–63). A member of an influential Roman Catholic family, he was a civil servant before World War II and was connected with the nationalists during the war.
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 as prime minister. In 1955 Diem engineered a referendum that abolished the monarchy and assumed control. Bao Dai subsequently lived in exile, primarily in France.

Bao Dai

 

Born Oct. 22,1913. Emperor of Annam from 1926 to 1945.

Bao Dai abdicated during the August revolution of 1945 in Vietnam. For several months in 1945 and 1946 he was an adviser to the government of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam. In the spring of 1946 he fled to Hong Kong; in March 1949 he signed an agreement with France that resulted in the creation of a puppet state on the French-occupied territory of Vietnam, headed by Bao Dai. As a result of a “referendum” in South Vietnam on Oct. 23, 1955, Bao Dai was removed as head of the “state of Vietnam.” Since April 1954 he has lived in France.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Bao Dai Library is the cultural and intellectual heart of the boat and is well stocked to provide an appropriate ambience for reading and relaxing.
Vietnam was separated at the 17th Parallel with the northern half governed by the Viet Minh and headed by Ho Chi Minh, while the remainder to the South becoming the State of Vietnam led by Emperor Bao Dai and Prime Minister Ngo Dinh Diem.
Against the directions of his superiors in Tokyo, General Tsuchihashi Yuitsu, who served as governor general of Japanese-occupied Indochina from 9 March to 28 August 1945, took the decision to keep Bao Dai as emperor of Vietnam, trying to "avoid the outrageous excitement that would have occurred in the country if he had placed Cuong De on the throne" (Namba 2012, p.
A puppet Vietnamese Government under ex-emperor Bao Dai was recognized in 1950 by the USA and Britain, ignoring the existence of the DRV.
It was here in 1945 that a delegation sent by the revolutionary leader Ho Chi Minh informed the last Nguyen emperor, Bao Dai, that his time was up.
Militarily he was able to defeat the Binh Xuyen and Hoa Hao, and politically he was able to outflank Emperor Bao Dai and General Nguyen Van Hinh, the leader of the South Vietnamese military.
Emperor Cruises have been inspired by the lifestyle and recreational interests of Emperor Bao Dai when he used to stay in his villas in Nha Trang and sail in the bay to go fishing around the offshore islands.
In private conversations royal descendants remarked that soon after the abdication of the last emperor Bao Dai (1945) in favour of the Viet Minh, the royal council responsible for ancestral affairs was disbanded and its sacred seat was destroyed in a devastating fire in 1947.
In 1933, Vietnamese Emperor Bao Dai, with the approval of the French, appointed him minister of the interior, a position from which Diem later resigned, publicly denouncing the emperor as "nothing but an instrument in the hands of the French.
Britain decided more or less to support the French in their opportunistic choice of the playboy emperor Bao Dai as a 'strong man' instead of the communist Ho Chi Minh.
Dalat was the residence of choice for Bao Dai, the last Nguyen dynasty emperor, who was a hunting enthusiast more comfortable with French than Vietnamese culture.
It was intended to be a temporary arrangement, but Bao Dai was thrown out in 1955 and replaced by Ngo Dinh Diem as president of a new southern republic.