Barabbas


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Related to Barabbas: Joseph of Arimathea, Mary Magdalene, Nicodemus

Barabbas

(bərăb`əs) [Aram.,=son of the father], bandit held in jail at the time of Jesus' arrest. Pontius Pilate, who, according to the Gospels, annually released a prisoner at Passover, offered to release Jesus, but the people demanded his death and Barabbas' delivery.

Barabbas

The Christian Bible gives four separate accounts of Jesus' trial before Pontius Pilate. In each of these stories the assembled crowd clamors for the release of a prisoner named Barabbas. When Pilate presents them with a choice between Barabbas and Jesus, the mob chooses Barabbas.

The Bible reveals little else about this man whose escape from death by crucifixion came at Jesus' expense (for more on crucifixion, see also Cross). The four Gospels describe him as a robber (John 18:40), a man who had committed murder in a recent political uprising (Mark 15:7 and Luke 23:19), and simply as "notorious" (Matthew 27:16). Some scholars who have examined the meaning of the ancient Greek word used to describe him as a thief have argued that this word was more often used to describe political rebels than it was to describe ordinary thieves and criminals.

Another clue to Barabbas'identity lies in the meaning of his last name. In Aramaic Barabbas means "son of the father." Some scholars see in this name a potential reference to Barabbas'own father. They interpret this name as a possible indication that Barabbas' father was a rabbi. The Gospel according to Matthew records that Barabbas' first name was Jesus, the Greek version of the Hebrew name Joshua. Joshua was a fairly common name among first-century Jews.

What happened to Barabbas after Jesus' death? The Bible doesn't record this information. In 1950 Swedish novelist Pär Lagerkvist published Barabbas, a fictional account of Barabbas'life after the Crucifixion. In this story a lifelong fascination with Jesus and with Christianity takes root in Barabbas as a result of his momentary yet disturbing encounter with Christ. The English translation of this novel appeared one year later in 1951, the same year in which Lagerkvist won the Nobel Prize for literature. Some ten years Lagerkvist's novel inspired the production of the Hollywood film, Barabbas (1961), based on the book.

Further Reading

Crosson, D. M. "Barabbas." In New Catholic Encyclopedia. Volume 2. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1967. Lagerkvist, Pär. Barabbas. New York: Vintage Books, 1951. Perkins, Pheme. "Barabbas." In Paul J. Achtemeier, ed. The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary. New York: HarperCollins, 1996. Trenchard, Warren C. "Barabbas." In David Noel Freedman, ed. Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible. Grand Rapids, MI: William B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2000.

Barabbas

robber freed in Christ’s stead. [N.T.: Matthew 27:15–18; Swed. Lit.: Barabbas]

Barabbas

thief released instead of Jesus to appease crowd. [N.T.: Matthew 27:16–26; Mark 15:7–15; John 18:40]

Barabbas

New Testament a condemned robber who was released at the Passover instead of Jesus (Matthew 27:16)
References in periodicals archive ?
Barabbas, the Scapegoat Ritual, and the Development of the Passion Narrative.
uk Louis Barabbas & The Bedlam Six (Kazimier, Wolstenhulme Square)), 9pm-12am.
To be sure, some have noted, in opposition to this, that shortly afterward the people chose for Barabbas and called for a cross for Jesus.
The pope writes that those responsible for Christ's crucifixion were the "aristocracy of the temple" in Jerusalem and the "masses" who acclaimed Barabbas instead of Jesus - not "the Jewish people as a whole.
Their topics include the voice of Jesus and the voice of Matthew in three parables, boundary challenges to the woman who anoints Jesus in Luke 7:36-50, Barabbas remembered, past and present antisemitic interpretation of Judas Iscariot, evidence from Hebrews about the worship of Jesus among early Christians, Paul and the nature of apostleship in Luke-Acts, the intertextual semantics of Leviticus 18:5 in Galatians and Romans, Romans 1:5 and Israel's triumphant king, the cheirograph in Colossians 2:14 and the Ephesian connection, and Paul's strategy for forging ties of kinship.
I raced through The Spear, followed naturally by Ben Hut (Lew Wallace), The Last Temptation of Christ (Nikos Kazantzakis), Barabbas (Par Lagerkvist), The Apostle (Sholem Asch), up to more recent efforts like the compelling rewriting of Genesis in The Red Tent (Anita Diamant).
In the interest of this larger agenda, he sees the material in Mark 14, which turns Jesus' last meal into a Passover meal, as a fabrication--so also in Peter's denial and the "false witness" and "destruction of the temple" passages in Mark 14 and in the Barabbas episode in Mark 15.
Doran, Chronicles of Barabbas, 1884-1934 (New York: Harcourt Brace and Company, 1935); George Parker, "Distributors, Agents and Publishers: Creating a Separate Market for Books in Canada, 1900-1920," Papers of the Bibliographical Society of Canada 43, no.
In accord with the practices to release one prisoner and crucify the other, Pilate asked the people whom he should release, Barabbas or Jesus, and the crowd chose Barabbas.
362), revealing his desire for Shylock's death--a desire that parallels the delight that Marlowe's audience felt in seeing Barabbas boiled alive or the humor Elizabethans found in Roderigo Lopez's dying words (Greenblatt 256-87)--both the Duke and Antonio learn from Portia's opening speech on the quality of mercy.
27:16) Only in John is Barabbas a simple crook: "Now Barabbas was a robber" (18:40).
Jesus and Barabbas reflect opposing characters in Ray films such as Bitter Victory and Wind across the Everglades with the exception now being that one is less flawed than the other.