Barbarisms


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Barbarisms

 

foreign words and expressions used in speech to describe realia, customs, and so forth of other peoples. Barbarisms may be incompletely assimilated by a language (semantically and sometimes even morphologically and syntactically). As a rule, they are used to express local color in designations of proper nouns (Jean, José), money (dollar, centime), posts and types of people (curé, mayor, gangster), details of everyday life, clothing, decoration, food, or titles (castanets, siuzane, redingote, sherbet, sir), and so on. They are also used to achieve a comic effect (“Avoue, don’t you have a connaissance with some sort of Frenchman?”—D. I. Fonvizin) and, in cases of foreign words, in the hope of displaying one’s education. Among barbarisms, exoticisms—descriptions of realia, usually taken from non-Indo-European languages such as giaour, aul, shalwar—are sometimes distinguished.

V. V. RASKIN

References in periodicals archive ?
The articles in this collection challenge the dichotomy set up by the title through an exuberant menagerie of barbarisms and barbarians and of humans, humanes, and humanisms.
Writing the Other: Humanism versus Barbarism in Tudor England (Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars, 2008).
THE CLASH OF BARBARISMS THE MAKING OF THE NEW WORLD DISORDER By Gilbert Achcar published by Saqi Edited By Peter Drucker ISBN 0 86356 919 6 price 12.
Each civilisation produces a specific form of barbarism which tends to take over in periods of crisis.
Glover wants to give ethics an empirical dimension and so provides a moral history that focuses on the erosion of moral value manifested in a variety of barbarisms of the 20th century.
The accounts of the barbarisms of the past century are stunning and G.
And it is especially distressing to see a fine writer like Dusinberre clutter his prose with the anachronisms - and barbarisms - demanded by our temporarily reigning feminist ideologues.