Bargello


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Bargello

(bärjĕl`lō), 13th-century palace in Florence, Italy, which houses the national museum. Once the residence of the highest city official, but later used as a prison and as the office of the chief of police (bargello), it was restored in 1859 to receive the art treasures of the city. The Bargello is famous for its courtyard and its Renaissance sculptures, including works by Michelangelo, Verrocchio, Donatello, the Della Robbias, Cellini, and others.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another statue in the Bargello is called David-Apollo because in the past some people said it was David and others said Apollo.
Along with the exhibition at the Museo Nazionale del Bargello in Florence in 2014, the present show directs further attention to this important sculptor, draughtsman, print designer and, occasionally, painter.
That includes famous galleries such as the Uffizi and Accademia, the Pitti Palace, Boboli Gardens and National Museum of Bargello.
Maher, who mostly trains pointto-pointers, is a grandson of one of Ireland's foremost stallion masters, the late Frank Latham, who stood influential jumping stallions such as Vulgan, Bargello and Le Bavard.
The David is incomparably more beautiful now than ever before, even though it would seem impossible," said Beatrice Paolozzi Strozzi, director of the Bargello Museum that hosts the statue.
Susan Kisro's INSTANT BARGELLO (9781564778543, $14.
On the right side of the painting behind elegantly styled city walls with gates and battlements one sees partial views of Florentine landmarks: the tower of the Palazzo della Signoria, the Bargello with the marzocco climbing up its metal staff, the Badia with its angel, and looming before all the other images of the urban landscape, Brunelleschi's dome, a clear reminder that this is Domenico's fifteenth-century Florence and not Dante's.
He was brought back to Florence, interrogated by the Eight on Security, confessed, and was hanged from the windows of the Bargello the same night.
Also worth visiting is the Bargello, one of Florence's oldest buildings and once the city's prison, now home to some of the city's finest examples of sculpture and the decorative arts by artists including the great Donatello.
Smith also provides useful information regarding the origins of several of Florence's 19th-century monuments dedicated to Dante, such as those at the Church of Santa Croce by Ricci (1830) and by Pazzi (1865), the Uffizi statue by Demi (1842), and the discovery in 1840 of what was believed, at the time, to be Giotto's "portrait" of Dante, in what is now the chapel of the Palazzo del Bargello.
The smaller, but no less stunning, bronze David is in the Bargello Museum.