barite

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Related to Barites: galena, fluorite

barite

(bâr`īt),

barytes

(bərī`tēz) [New Lat., from barium], or

heavy spar,

a white, yellow, blue, red, or colorless mineral. It is a sulfate of barium, BaSO4, found in nature as tabular crystals or in granular or massive form and has a high specific gravity. The mineral is widely distributed throughout the world. It often occurs in veins with lead and zinc minerals. It is insoluble in water, and this property is made use of in testing for the sulfatesulfate,
chemical compound containing the sulfate (SO4) radical. Sulfates are salts or esters of sulfuric acid, H2SO4, formed by replacing one or both of the hydrogens with a metal (e.g., sodium) or a radical (e.g., ammonium or ethyl).
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 radical. It is practically insoluble under ordinary conditions in all the usual chemical reagents. Barite is used as a commercial source of barium and many of its compounds. Ground barite is used as a filler in the manufacture of linoleum, oilcloth, paper and textile manufacturing, rubber, and plastics. Finely ground barite is used to make a thixotropic mud for sealing oil wells during drilling. Prime white, a bleached barite, is used as a pigment in white paint but is not as satisfactory as blanc fixe, a chemically precipitated barium sulfate, or lithopone, a mixture of barium sulfate, zinc sulfide, and zinc oxide.

barite

[′ba‚rīt]
(mineralogy)
BaSO4 A white, yellow, or colorless orthorhombic mineral occurring in tabular crystals, granules, or compact masses; specific gravity is 4.5; used in paints and drilling muds and as a source of barium chemicals; the principal ore of barium. Also known as baryte; barytine; cawk; heavy spar.

barite

A mineral used in concrete as an aggregate, esp. for the construction of high-density radiation shielding; also called barium sulfate.
References in periodicals archive ?
5-2 m high) cave structures with speleothem precipitates, such as botryoidal calcite, spar calcite, barite crystal aggregates and pyrite, are mostly found in the central and southern part of the quarry in the sub-vertical contact zones between limestone and dolomite bodies.
The barite aggregates studied were collected from different cave systems and fractures/veins in different locations all over the quarry.
The XRD pattern analysis of speleothem and vein barite mineralization was carried out on the powdered unoriented preparations with the Bruker D8 Advance diffractometer using Johannson-type primary monochromator filtered Cu-K[alpha] radiation and the LyxEye detector system.
Much high-quality hematite, including "kidney ore" and "pencil ore," and also fine specimens of quartz, calcite and barite were recovered.
The Goose Green mine was the source of superb specimens of "kidney ore" as well as dolomite, hematite-colored quartz crystals and large, brownish crystals of barite on dolomite matrix dusted over with red hematite.
Superb cabinet-size clusters of pale blue or yellow platy barite crystals, some of them tinted red by hematite inclusions, were also produced by the Pallaflat mine in the early 1900s.
It was during this activity, beginning in October of 1999, that interesting mineral specimens of crystallized barite began to be encountered.
These conditions are quite similar to those encountered at the nearby Meikle mine barite occurrence.
Barite is the species of major interest to collectors, and is widespread throughout the mine.
In the Moscona mine, yellow transparent barite crystals have been found, up to 3 cm, associated with the well-known yellow fluorite and with calcite crystals.
With signs of an upturn in the drilling sector, which accounts for 75-80% of barite consumption, demand for barite is forecast to rise, In fact, Roskill sai demand for barite may show a higher rate of growth than drilling activity through the '90s because of a trend towards deeper drilling which requires larger quantities of drilling fluids, an increase in the development of smaller fields (especially in the North Sea), and a shift in production away from the United States.
One factor that may reduce consumption is the potential increase in the recover and recycling of barite from water-based drilling fluids.