Barmakids


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Barmakids

(bär`məkĭdz') or

Barmecides

(bär`məsīdz'), Persian-descended religious family from KhorasanKhorasan
or Khurasan
, region and former province (1991 pop. 6,013,200), c.125,000 sq mi (323,750 sq km), NE Iran. Mashhad is the chief city; other cities include Sabzevar, Bojnurd, and Neyshabur. It is mainly mountainous and arid.
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. They served as viziers to the AbbasidAbbasid
or Abbaside
, Arab family descended from Abbas, the uncle of Muhammad. The Abbasids held the caliphate from 749 to 1258, but they were recognized neither in Spain nor (after 787) W of Egypt.
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 caliphs in the 8th cent. Khalid ibn Barmak, d. 782?, supported the revolution that brought about Abbasid rule. He was given certain ministerial powers, such as tax collecting and control over the army; later, he was appointed governor of FarsFars
or Farsistan
, province (1991 pop. 3,543,828), c.51,500 sq mi (133,400 sq km), SW Iran. Shiraz is the capital and chief city, located in an oasis occupying a valley c.6 mi (10 km) wide and 20 mi (32 km) long. The province is largely mountainous.
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 and governor of Tabaristan. Yahya, d. 805, son of Khalid, became secretary to the caliph's son, Harun ar-RashidHarun ar-Rashid
[Arab.,=Aaron the Upright], c.764–809, 5th and most famous Abbasid caliph (786–809). He succeeded his brother Musa al-Hadi, fourth caliph, a year after the death of his father, Mahdi, the third caliph.
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. Yahya and Harun were imprisoned by the caliph's successor, Musa al-Hadi, who died soon afterward. Harun became caliph and made Yahya chief administrator. Yahya's sons, Jafar, d. 803, and al-Fadl, d. 808, also became administrators during the reign of Harun. Jafar headed various interior departments. Al-Fadl eventually assumed his father's central duties and was appointed governor of Khorasan. However, by 800 the Barmakids' power and status were rapidly declining. Jafar was executed in 803; Yahya and al-Fadl died in prison.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among them are discussions of the cities Baghdad and Basra and of important people such as al-Baqullani in theology, the three brothers called the Banu Musa in the sciences, the Abbasid chancellor family Barmakids, and Batazid Bastami in the mystical tradition.
Praising the government and people of the United Arab Emirates as "Arab Barmakids," Abdul Rasoul said that they were the first to share both happiness and sorrow with the Iraqi people.
The Barmakids were a noble Persian family which came to great political power under the Abbasid caliphs.
The capital was shift ed from Damascus to the newly built city of Baghdad and the administration was placed in the hands of a loyal and competent family, the Barmakids of Persia.
7) In his view, court intrigue has received more than its fair share of attention and he emphasizes instead that the struggle over the succession was not confined to Baghdad and that Harun's accession was more than "a neatly executed coup d'etat pulled off in Baghdad by the Barmakids and al-Khayzuran.
This is the one passage above all in al-Tabari where, as Bonner points out, the reader gains the impression that the generals were solidly behind al-Hadi with only the Barmakids backing Harun, and it forms an important part of Kennedy's argument: Bonner, "Al-Khalifa Al-Mardit," 84; Kennedy, Early Abbasid Caliphate, 110-11.
139) The poet Salm al-Khasir, an adherent of the Barmakids, may have expressed a similar preference for [ahd.
One story, preserved by al-Jahshiyari, and collected by al-Tanukhi, places Yahya in the company of the Barmakids ur.
subset]]Ubayd Allah or his partisans, to link him to the legacy of the Barmakids.
Surely some indication of this would have been given as, for example, in the case of the Barmakids.
Thus, the idealized image of the ascetic, ghazi-caliph whose fate is so intricately and tragically bound up with that of the Barmakids "was contrived long after the caliph's death to serve ideals and social interests that prevailed in the later ninth century" (p.
These three volumes do contain some very readable and interesting narratives about major topics, such as the fail of the Barmakids or the institution of the mihna.