barn raising

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barn raising

In the United States before the 20th century, a cooperative effort in which the elements of the framework for a large barn were assembled and lifted into place. The walls were supported by sections of a massive timber framework, called bent frames. First, the cellar was dug and the barn floor constructed. Next, the bent frames were assembled on the ground adjacent to the barn by fitting the various components of the frame together and fastening them with wood pegs driven into previously drilled holes. Finally, at the appropriate locations, each bent frame was raised into an upright position by the use of long poles with steel points (barn pikes) and then interconnected with other bent frames. See the illustration under bent frame showing how the bent frames were raised, an action that required considerable manpower and therefore the assistance of neighbors; this collaborative effort is also known as a barn raising or raising bee.
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Based on the Amish concept of a barnraising, a Webraising demonstrates the power of neighbor helping neighbor as students aid local, community-based non- profit organizations by creating Web sites, or in some cases, re-launching existing sites to improve appearance and function.
CARDIFF: g39 (029 2025 5541), Barnraising & Bunkers.
until June 11 Barnraising and Bunkers is part of Diffusion: Cardiff international Festival of Photography @ g39, Oxford Street until June 29 Nowicki vs.
The Chiba City barnraising is a great example of the kind of community spirit that the project will support," said Remy Evard, manager of advanced computing and networking in Argonne's Mathematics and Computer Science Division.
Volunteers of all ages, faiths and walks of life come together to help their neighbor's in what has become a new tradition in the spirit of an old fashioned American barnraising.
Volunteers from all ages, faiths and walks of life come together to help their neighbor's in what has become a new tradition in the spirit of an old fashioned American barnraising.