Barrel Vault

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Related to Barrel vaults: tunnel vault

barrel vault

[′bar·əl ‚vȯlt]
(architecture)
A masonry vault of plain, semicircular cross section, supported by parallel walls or arcades and adapted to longitudinal areas. Also known as barrel roof; cradle vault; tunnel vault; wagonhead vault; wagon vault.

barrel vault

A masonry vault resting on two parallel walls having the form of a half cylinder, sometimes called a tunnel vault.
See also: Vault

Barrel Vault

 

in architecture, a roof shaped as a semi-cylinder with a raised and tapered top, as a result of which the facade has a keellike pediment. Barrel vaults, seen in religious and civil architecture of the 17th and 18th centuries, are most often built of wood (for example, the churches of the Russian north, the palace in Kolomenskoie) and more rarely of stone (the church in the village of Taininskaia in Moscow Oblast). The crossing of two barrel vaults forms a cross barrel vault or a cubelike roof.

barrel vault, barrel roof, cradle vault, tunnel vault, wagonhead vault, wagon vault

A masonry vault of plain, semicircular cross section, supported by parallel walls or arcades and adapted to longitudinal areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Photo: Three barrel vaults cover circulation core of house; all rooms flank the central staircase, which doubles back to reach upper bedroom.
The unique baroque ceiling structure between caves and wearing an ornate marble hall with ornate marble floor and incrustations suspended ceiling with a varied Grottierung and a large ceiling fresco in the nave and barrel vaults, painted in the two aisles.
The main gallery space has rows of cast-iron columns supporting ornate barrel vaults, each more than 3m wide.
The scoops have pitched roofs capped by 4-foot-wide barrel vaults framed with plywood ribs.
The crescent-shaped translucent roof, sheltering kiosks and travellers, is likely to be as distinctive and unique to Hamburg as the glazed barrel vaults of the city's nineteenth-century railway station.
In Europe, seminal buildings such as Labrouste's Bibiliotheque de Saint-Genevieve pioneered the use of cast iron internally in Gothicized barrel vaults of prefabricated sections.