Barricade


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barricade

[′bar·ə‚kād]
(engineering)
Structure composed essentially of concrete, earth, metal, or wood, or any combination thereof, and so constructed as to reduce or confine the blast effect and fragmentation of an explosion.

Barricade

 

an artificial obstacle of logs, sandbags, rocks, trees, and other materials at hand piled up across streets, roads, near bridges, on mountain passes, and so on. Barricades were used in the 13th and 14th centuries in the defense of Moscow, Riazan’, Vladimir, and other cities from the Mongol-Tatar hordes, in 1611 during the defense of Moscow from Polish invaders, and in the 17th and 18th centuries during the peasant wars led by Stepan Razin and Emel’ian Pugachev. Barricades were widely used during uprisings of the proletariat in Paris in 1827, 1830,1832, and 1834; in Brussels in 1830; in Lyon in 1834; in Prague and Berlin in 1848; and in Dresden in 1849. During the Paris Commune of 1871 bitter battles were fought on the barricades.

During the 1905 Revolution and the Great October Socialist Revolution in Russia the people in revolt used barricades widely in the fight against the tsarist troops. They were built on many streets of Moscow. During the Civil War of 1918–20 and the Great Patriotic War of 1941–45, barricades were built during the conduct of combat operations for certain cities.

M. G. ZHDANOV

barricade

An obstruction to deter the passage of persons or vehicles.
References in classic literature ?
That evening Jo forgot to barricade her corner, and had not been in her seat five minutes, before a massive form appeared beside her, and with both arms spread over the sofa back, both long legs stretched out before him, Laurie exclaimed, with a sigh of satisfaction.
The Lakeman now patrolled the barricade, all the while keeping his eye on the Captain, and jerking out such sentences as these: --"It's not our fault; we didn't want it; I told him to take his hammer away; it was boy's business; he might have known me before this; I told him not to prick the buffalo; I believe I have broken a finger here against his cursed jaw; ain't those mincing knives down in the forecastle there, men?
Before the entrance lay many large fragments of rock of different sizes, similar to others scattered along the entire base of the cliff, and it was in Tarzan's mind that if he found the cave unoccupied he would barricade the door and insure himself a quiet and peaceful night's repose within the sheltered interior.
Four, however, escaped and disappeared into the forecastle, where they hoped to barricade themselves against further assault.
Make haste while yet you may, and if we can barricade it until the sun rises we may yet escape.
If she could but get the old woman out, thought Bertrade, she could barricade herself within and thus delay, at least, her impending fate in the hope that succor might come from some source.
There were loose rocks strewn all about with which I might build a barricade across the entrance to the cave, and so I halted there and pointed out the place to Ajor, trying to make her understand that we would spend the night there.
At midnight, people again knocked at the gate of the jail, or rather at the barricade which served in its stead: it was Cornelius van Baerle whom they were bringing.
Every night we arranged pit-falls for the robbers, and all filed up to bed, bearing plate, money, weapons, and things to barricade with, as if we lived in war times.
The trunks of several trees had been wattled across, the intervals strengthened with stakes, and the ground behind this barricade levelled up with earth to make the floor.
On this course nine obstacles had been arranged: the stream, a big and solid barrier five feet high, just before the pavilion, a dry ditch, a ditch full of water, a precipitous slope, an Irish barricade (one of the most difficult obstacles, consisting of a mound fenced with brushwood, beyond which was a ditch out of sight for the horses, so that the horse had to clear both obstacles or might be killed); then two more ditches filled with water, and one dry one; and the end of the race was just facing the pavilion.
I stood beside the sources of the Arveiron, which take their rise in a glacier, that with slow pace is advancing down from the summit of the hills to barricade the valley.