(redirected from Barristers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.


see attorneyattorney,
agent put in place of another to manage particular affairs of the principal. An attorney in fact is an agent who conducts business under authority that is controlled and limited by a written document called a letter, or power, of attorney granted by the principal.
..... Click the link for more information.



(from the English “bar”—the barrier separating the court from the defendant), the highest rank for a lawyer in England. In order to receive the title of barrister, it is necessary to have a higher legal education, to attend a three-year training program at one of the lawyers’ associations (Inns of Court), and to pass a comprehensive examination in the law. Only after this can a candidate become a member of an Inn of Court with the title of barrister and obtain the right to act as counsel in all (including the highest) courts. Usually a barrister initiates proceedings only through the intermediary of a solicitor except in those criminal cases that the barrister undertakes himself. The separation of English lawyers into barristers and solicitors, which dates back to the 13—14th centuries, is an anachronism which has been noted even in English juridical literature. The existence of two categories of lawyers and the resulting peculiarities of conducting cases significantly increase the expenses of conducting legal business. The barristers are closely linked to the ruling elite of the English bourgeoisie and play a marked role in the political life of the nation. The attorney general and the judges of the superior courts of law are usually appointed from among the barristers.



1. (in England) a lawyer who has been called to the bar and is qualified to plead in the higher courts
2. (in Canada) a lawyer who pleads in court
3. US a less common word for lawyer
References in classic literature ?
Then the barrister said in a lower voice, which seemed at once sympathetic and creepy: "Did you see it distinctly?
Now, in my opinion, the barrister who put forward this extraordinary plea was probably absolutely convinced that he was stating the most liberal, the most humane, the most enlightened view of the case that could possibly be brought forward in these days.
The barrister who has his case at his fingers' ends and is able to argue with an expert upon his own subject finds that a week or two of the courts will drive it all out of his head once more.
Sandys, who was a barrister with a philosophic tendency, took out his pipe, lit it, murmured "hum" and "ha," and was silent.
He was a barrister also, but he loathed a profession which kept him indoors over books, and directly his widowed mother died he was going, so he confided to Susan, to take up flying seriously, and become partner in a large business for making aeroplanes.
I intend to go to town and eat my dinners as a barrister, since, they say, that is the preparation for all public business.
The unfortunate Mill, who was tried after me, with a mere dry-eyed barrister to defend him, was hanged.
After five years we find him indeed a barrister and a Member of Parliament, but among the many great men of his age he was still of little account.
John practiced for some time as a barrister, but had finally settled down to the more congenial life of a country squire.
I have already said, I think, that at that period, being a young barrister with but few briefs, I frequented the Palais de Justice rather for the purpose of familiarising myself with my professional duties than for the defence of the widow and orphan.
He was a barrister by profession; a ladies' man by temperament; and a good Samaritan by choice.
His partners were the gloomily humorous editor of a celebrated magazine; a silent, elderly barrister with malicious little eyes; and a highly martial, simple-minded old Colonel with nervous brown hands.