tumulus

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tumulus

(to͞o`myələs), plural tumuli (–lī), in archaeology, a heap of earth or stones placed over a grave. The terms moundmound,
prehistoric earthwork erected over a burial place as a memorial or landmark, a defensive embankment, or a site for ceremonial or religious rites. Such structures are found in many parts of the world, but the name is applied in particular to those of North America,
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, barrowbarrow,
in archaeology, a burial mound. Earth and stone or timber are the usual construction materials; in parts of SE Asia stone and brick have entirely replaced earth. A barrow built primarily of stone is often called a cairn.
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, or cairncairn,
pile of stones, usually conical in shape, raised as a landmark or a memorial. In prehistoric times it was usually erected over a burial. A barrow is sometimes called a cairn.
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 are more common in modern usage.

tumulus

A mound of earth or stone protecting a tomb chamber or simple grave; a barrow, 2.

tumulus

Archaeol (no longer in technical usage) another word for barrow2