basement rock

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basement rock

[′bās·mənt ‚räk]
(building construction)
References in periodicals archive ?
The southeastern highlands of central Cape Breton Island rise to an altitude of 300 m forming a plateau of Late Neoproterozoic basement rocks adjacent to lowland valleys and a coastal plain underlain by Carboniferous sedimentary rocks of the Horton and Windsor groups.
Block 32's main producing reservoirs are Qishn clastics and Basement rocks.
The Arabian Peninsula is part of the Pre-Cambrian Arabian-Nubian Shield and can be sub-divided into two adjacent structural regions: The internal stable area (Arabian Platform), which includes the Pre-Cambrian basement rocks and the over-lying sedimentary cover.
Well 16/2-20S was drilled to a total depth of 2,070 metres below mean sea level into basement rocks.
Often, economic mineral deposits are contained within basement rocks, buried below several hundred metres of transported cover (overburden) and cannot be located through surface exploration methods such as soil sampling, geochemical assays and drilling.
The location of older Paleozoic basement rocks has been identified to be between 275 and 375 meters below surface, confirming the mineralization model developed by Company geologists.
The topics include Vishnu basement rocks of the upper Granite Gorge: continent formation 1.
The present study was focused on analysing and interpreting aero-magnetic data over Wamba and its adjoining areas Its purpose was to map metalliferous mineral deposits in the basement rocks, delineate structural lineaments and their trends as well as to determine the depth to magnetic source bodies (and possibly sediment thickness) in the sedimentary part of the area Such structural lineaments (i e fractures, faults, shear zones and veins) usually serve as potential hosts or migration paths for groundwater, hydrocarbons and minerals Sediment thickness is very important in any sedimentary basin regarding to hydrocarbon formation
The basement rocks were later covered with sedimentary deposits from those Cambrian seas, creating the boundary now recognized as the Great Unconformity.
According to Eigbefo (1978), the superficial deposits, which overlie the basement rocks, act as recharge materials, especially where they are underlain by weathered basement.
Deep Yellow has identified high grade uranium mineralisation in the basement rocks beneath the palaeochannel, the mineralised red sand adjacent to the channel similar to the Tubas Red Sand (TRS) deposit material and additional mineralisation within the palaeochannel.
The project (76,354 hectares/188,675 acres) covers an area where historic exploration data identified favourable basement rocks capable of hosting uranium mineralization.