basilica

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basilica

(bəsĭl`ĭkə), large building erected by the Romans for transacting business and disposing of legal matters. Rectangular in form with a roofed hall, the building usually contained an interior colonnade, with an apse at one end or at each end. The central aisle tended to be wide and was higher than the flanking aisles, so that light could penetrate through the clerestory windows. The oldest known basilica was built in Rome in 184 B.C. by the elder Cato. Other early examples are the Basilica Porcia in Rome and one at Pompeii (late 2d cent. B.C.). Probably the most splendid Roman basilica is the one constructed during the reign of Maxentius and finished by Constantine after 313. In the 4th cent. Christians began to build edifices for worship that were related to the form of the basilicas. These had a center nave with one aisle at each side and an apse at one end: on this platform sat the bishop and priests. Basilicas of this type were built not only in Western Europe but in Greece, Syria, Egypt, and Palestine. A good example of the Middle Eastern basilica is the Church of the Nativity at Bethlehem (6th cent.). The finest basilicas in Rome were St. John Lateran and St. Paul's-outside-the-Walls (4th cent.), and San Clemente (6th cent.). Gradually there emerged the massive Romanesque churches, which still retained the fundamental plan of the basilica.

Basilica

A Roman hall of justice with a high central space lit by a clerestory with a timbered gable roof. It became the form of the early Christian church, with a semicircular apse at the end preceded by a vestibule and atrium.

Basilica

 

(Greek: Basiliká), last codification of Byzantine law, completed in A.D. 890 during the reign of Emperor Leo VI (the Wise), and consisting of 60 books.

The Basilica is based on Justinian’s code of laws. Nevertheless, certain of the code’s regulations that were outmoded or abolished were not included in the Basilica. Moreover, in the Basilica each legal institution is examined in only one place and not in various books, as was the case with Justinian’s code of laws. In drawing up the Basilica, the Procheiron was also utilized, and in the latest copies of the Basilica excerpts are cited from the works of Byzantine jurists of the 11th and 12th centuries. In its class orientation the Basilica reflected the process of peasant oppression. Serfdom was again legalized, and restrictions were removed on the enlargement of private landholdings.

REFERENCE

Basilicorum libri LX, vols. 1-6, edited by C. G. E. Heimbach; vol. 7, edited by E. G. Terrini and J. Mercati. Leipzig, 1833-97.

Z. M. CHERNILOVSKII

basilica

basilica: Typical plan. A, D, apse; B, B’, secondary apse; C, high altar; D, bishop’s throne; G, transept; H, nave; J, J’, aisles
1. A Roman hall of justice, typically with a high central space lit by a clerestory and lower aisles all around it, and with apses or exedrae for the seats of the judges.
2. The form of the early Christian church, a central high nave with clerestory, lower aisles along the sides only,

basilica

1. a Roman building, used for public administration, having a large rectangular central nave with an aisle on each side and an apse at the end
2. a rectangular early Christian or medieval church, usually having a nave with clerestories, two or four aisles, one or more vaulted apses, and a timber roof
3. a Roman Catholic church having special ceremonial rights
References in periodicals archive ?
Yasin's main argument is that it was not saints' relics that were the focus of architecture and ritual activity in a late antique church, but instead it was prayer and the eucharistic ritual, which had defined Christian places of worship even before the basilica was invented.
After de-centering saints and their relics from being the most important features in churches, she then proceeds to demonstrate that saints were nevertheless an integral part of churches: their names were recited in the liturgy, their portraits appear both in the apse and along the walls of various churches, and their bodies are found both under altars and in other parts of the basilica, or even in separate buildings that make up part of a basilica complex.
Joseph's Basilica, the oldest of 75 Polish-American parishes in New England, is the "Mother Church of all New England Polish-Americans," according to the monsignor.
A basilica must satisfy certain criteria, Monsignor Czarnecki said.
PERHAPS IT WAS THAT SENSE OF smallness or sameness that drove medieval Christians to make pilgrimages to the great churches of Europe, to take to the road and visit the shrines of saints in basilicas scattered from England to Italy.
Each day, with guidebook, map, and camera in hand, we set off for another Gothic basilica, this one with a pulpit by Donatello, that one with a crucifix by Giotto.
The church was designed in the form of a Latin cross and in the style of a Roman Basilica (Fig.
The Basilica has been subsequently renovated and additions made since its completion almost 150 years ago.
Archbishop George Carey and Metropolitan Athanasios, representing Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, the spiritual leader of the world's Orthodox Christians, knelt in silent prayer with the Pontiff after helping him to push open the Holy Door of St Paul's Outside the Walls Basilica.
Such musicians had been employed for decades in the pope's private cappella, but to Nicholas belongs the credit for establishing a parallel policy at the basilica, using enhanced salaries and patronage to attract qualified northern singers to St.
Peter's Basilica April 11 served as a harbinger of the challenges facing his successor.
The ancient Jubilee tradition of opening the Holy Doors at the four patriarchal basilicas has always been carried out by four different people, the Pope and three Cardinal Legates.