Bassianus


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Bassianus

murdered after being falsely accused. [Br. Lit.: Titus Andronicus]
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Lavinia then is whisked off stage by Bassianus who claims to have a prior espousal.
When Lavinia's husband, Bassianus, is killed by Tamora's sons, Chiron and Demetrius, Lavinia, fearing her imminent torture, begs Tamora to intervene as a woman and a mother.
His folly became quickly apparent as Saturninus looked lecherously at the feral beauty of the prone, bedraggled, near-naked Tamora, even as he held Lavinia's hand in gloating triumph over his brother Bassianus.
The Folio describes Bassianus as "embrewed here / All on a heape" (TLN 976-77), while the Quarto records him as being "bereaud in blood" (18).
The people of Rome are mainly divided in two opposing factions, each supporting one of the dead emperor's sons, Saturninus and Bassianus (James Frain), both of whom claim the throne.
One of the most important historic events in the city took place in 218 AD, when the soldiers of the Legio III Gallica elected Varius Avitus Bassianus, also known as Elagabalus, as emperor.
Strangely, Bassianus describes him as 'Cimmerian', a people, according to various sources, including a 1565 Thesaurus (Titus Andronicus, p.
Saturninus, to spite his brother Bassianus, demands the hand of Lavinia, Titus's daughter.
Bassianus comments that by means of his hand, Titus "hath express'd himself in all his deeds/ A father and a friend to [.
Saturninus and Bassianus dispute which brother has the rightful claim to the empery.
Spotting Tamora far outside the city walls and concluding that she is about to commit adultery, Bassianus is the first Roman to stumble across Tamora's "reformed" sanctuary: "Who have we here?