Bataan Day


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Bataan Day

April 9
A national legal holiday in the Philippines in commemoration of the disastrous World War II Battle of Bataan in 1942, in which the Philippines fell to the Japanese. It is also known as Araw ng Kagitingan or Heroes Day in the Philippines. Also remembered on this date are the 37,000 U.S. and Filipino soldiers who were captured and the thousands who died during the infamous 70-mile "death march" from Mariveles to a Japanese concentration camp inland at San Fernando. Ceremonies are held at Mt. Samat Shrine, the site of side-by-side fighting by Filipino and American troops.
CONTACTS:
Philippine Tourism Center
556 Fifth Ave.
New York, NY 10036
212-575-7915; fax: 212-302-6759
www.wowphilippines.com.ph
SOURCES:
AnnivHol-2000, p. 59
References in periodicals archive ?
Also set on Bataan Day is the "Galing Bataan Trade Fair," which will feature the best of Bataan products, destinations, and services on April 7 at the city plaza.
Ople's call came on the eve of the commemoration of Bataan Day on Sunday.
There had been much criticism of what used to be called Bataan Day, to mark the 'Fall of Bataan.
We have renamed Bataan Day as "Day of Valor" - to correct any misimpression that we are a nation of masochists celebrating surrender.
World War II is long over, but we haven't moved on since we still observe occasions like Bataan Day.
It was good of the Inquirer to give ample space to the battle of Bataan on Bataan Day, April 9, 2016.
By the way, the United States does not observe Bataan Day as a national holiday.
Editors note: Article is based on a talk delivered during the forum, "Bataan Legacy in Manila, 73rd Anniversary of Bataan Day," at De La Salle University, April 8.
Ask my generation of Filipinos born in the first decade after World War II what April 9 commemorates, and we're more likely to say Bataan Day because that was the old name of the holiday promulgated by law in 1961.
Day of Valor, also known as Bataan Day, is a national public holiday.
More significant than the recognition of the heroism of the Marine detachment on Ayungin Shoal was the ceremony on Bataan Day at Mount Samat, site of the Shrine of Valor for Filipino soldiers who died defending the Bataan peninsula against the Japanese invasion.
For some reason or other, it was the images from those two visits that dominated my reflection on the significance of Bataan Day.