Batten


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Related to Batten: batten down, batten down the hatches, Batten disease

batten

1. a narrow flat length of wood or plastic inserted in pockets of a sail to give it proper shape
2. a lath used for holding a tarpaulin along the side of a raised hatch on a ship
3. Theatre
a. a row of lights
b. the strip or bar supporting them
4. NZ an upright part of a fence made of wood or other material, designed to keep wires at equal distances apart

Batten

Jean. 1909--82, New Zealand aviator: the first woman to fly single-handed from Australia to Britain (1935)

Batten

A narrow strip of wood that is applied over a joint between parallel boards in the same plane. In roofing, the standing seam of a metal roof gives the same appearance of a batten,

Batten

 

(Russian tes), a thin board obtained by sawing softwood logs lengthwise. Battens are 4–6.4 m long, 19–25 mm thick, and usually 100–110 mm wide. They are used in shipbuilding and railroad car construction to form paneling—either flush or with spaces between the planks—and to cover roofs and panel walls. Originally, boards obtained from the roughhewing of logs (obtesyvanie), which were usually first split in half, were designated by the term tes.

batten

[′bat·ən]
(aerospace engineering)
Metal, wood, or plastic panels laced to the envelope of a blimp in the nose cone to add rigidity to the nose and provide a good point of attachment for mooring.
(building construction)
A sawed timber strip of specific dimension-usually 7 inches (18 centimeters) broad, less than 4 inches (10 centimeters) thick, and more than 6 feet (1.8 meters) long-used for outside walls of houses, flooring, and such.
A strip of wood nailed across a door or other structure made of parallel boards to strengthen it and prevent warping.

batten

1. A narrow strip of wood applied to cover a joint along the edges of two parallel boards in the same plane.
2. A strip of wood fastened across two or more parallel boards to hold them together; also called a cross batten
3. A flat strip of wood attached to a wall as a base for lathing, plastering, etc.; also called a furring strip.
4. In roofing, a wood strip applied over boards or roof structural members; used as a base for the attachment of slate, wood, or clay-tile shingles.
5.See board and batten
6. A board usually 2 in. (5 cm) to 4 in. (10 cm) thick and usually used as a lathing support or in flooring.
7. A steel strip used to secure metal flooring on a fire escape.
8. On a theater stage, a strip of wood to frame, stiffen, or reinforce a flat, or to fasten several flats together.
9. On a theater stage, length of hollow metal of round, square, or rectangular cross section used in connection with stage rigging to hang scenery or lighting equipment, such as a pipe batten or lighting batten.
References in periodicals archive ?
Funds from the National Institutes of Health (grants NS068099, NSR077516, EY023968), the Batten Disease Support and Research Association, Jasper Against Batten Fund at Partnership for Cures and Blake's Purpose Foundation, and the Roy Carver Trust supported this research.
Batten and co-host Jesse Solomon, who founded the Academy of Guitar, will help musicians find inner focus, energize mind and body, develop techniques to support creativity, boost their brand and attract and hold audiences.
Mr Batten was pronounced dead at the scene and a post mortem revealed he died of a transected aorta as a result of a decelleration injury which Mr Gittins described as "unsurvivable" which would have caused immediate death.
Batten denied three counts of indecent assault and one of indecency with a child but was convicted by a jury.
Opportunistic Batten, then in his early 40s, assaulted the youngster when his teacher wife was out of the living room.
Today Rachel reveals how: Batten terrified her into keeping the abuse secret by telling her she could be sent to prison; The former British Rail worker contin-ued to visit her on Christmas Day in the years after assaulting her; The abuse led her to develop ME, and; ?
Those born to parents who carry gene mutations for Batten disease are at risk to inherit the condition which can cause vision loss and seizures, progressively impairs cognitive and motor capacities, and ultimately results in death.
A batten running the entire width of the sail is most critical in the top sections of a mainsail, because here the roach represents the greatest percentage of the chord (straight line distance between leech and luff).
Mrs Batten has been collecting for the Poppy Appeal in Coventry for more than 40 years.
A spokeswoman for Ysbyty Glan Clwyd, run by Betsi Cadwaladr University Health Board, said: "The North Wales Genetic Service sees and advises people on inherited genetic conditions, such as Battens Disease.
What encourages me most," continues Batten "is Skila's impressive sales pipeline and product suite, including the recently launched iKOL database that contains real-time identification and profiling capabilities for more than 2.
Jack Batten has taken on a broad and ambitious subject in his latest book, TheWar to End All Wars: The Story of World War I.