Actium

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Actium

(ăk`tēəm, –shē–), promontory, NW Acarnania, Greece, at the mouth of the Ambracian Gulf. There are vestiges of several temples and an ancient town. At Actium was fought the naval battle (31 B.C.) in which the forces of Octavian (later Augustus) under Agrippa defeated the sea and land forces of Antony and Cleopatra. The battle established Octavian as ruler of Rome. The Actian games, held at NicopolisNicopolis
[Gr.,=city of victory], ancient city, NW Greece, in Epirus. It was founded by Octavian (later Augustus) to celebrate the victory (31 B.C.) at Actium, which is nearby. The city largely eclipsed Ambracia (see Árta). It is mentioned by St. Paul (Titus 3.12).
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 every four years, were established to commemorate the event.

actium

[′ak·tē·əm]
(ecology)
A rocky seashore community.

Actium

Octavian’s naval defeat of Antony and Cleopatra (31 B.C.). [Rom. Hist.: NCE, 15]
See: Battle

Actium

a town of ancient Greece that overlooked the naval battle in 31 bc at which Octavian's fleet under Agrippa defeated that of Mark Antony and Cleopatra
References in periodicals archive ?
Though overt references to the battle of Actium are hard to find in these two poems, and are possibly absent, both Vergil and Propertius would later link the temple more directly to Actium.
Cleopatra flees in the battle of Actium so as to offer Antony, for his good, a world of love as an alternative to "the logic of plunder and war," and although I can see nothing in the play to suggest that one should view her action in this way, one cannot but warm to what Bonnefoy is pursuing here, a love that frees and preserves, "an aptitude for the lived moment, for its fullness, its light.
when Octavian, Caesar's nephew, collected all power to himself after defeating Mark Anthony in the battle of Actium, which Virgil celebrated in his last poem, the Aeneid.
After 10 years of rivalry, he forced Lepidus into retirement and defeated Mark Antony and his Egyptian allies led by Cleopatra at the naval battle of Actium.
Their bloody replay of Caesar and Pompey's earlier contest, complete with political compacts, arranged marriages, and agreements signed and broken, finally culminated in Octavian's defeat of Antony at the battle of Actium in 31 B.
The real point about this incident, which Shakespeare drives home to his audiences in his other Roman and early British plays, is that if Antony and Cleopatra with Enobarbus had won the battle of Actium, Western Europe and its civilization could have been fashioned on a corrupted system of government with personal, arbitrary rule exercised by eastern-style potentates, instead of that offered by Rome which favoured the rule of law and a system of government by consent which Octavius represents for theatre-goers to the play.
until Antony's defeat in the battle of Actium in 31 B.
Cleopatra and Mark Anthony were defeated by Octavian, the future Emperor Augustus, in the battle of Actium in 31 B.
Octavian's Apolline commemorations at the site of Actium--the shrine to Apollo there, the games, and so forth--had, according to Gurval, no immediate impact in the capital city; the Palatine Temple of Apollo (dedicated in 28) did not celebrate the battle of Actium.
In two millennia, nobody has ever suggested that Cleopatra survived following her disastrous defeat at the Battle of Actium, or that anyone murdered her.
The battle of Actium in the legend of Cleopatra is considered comic and gross; the amen at the end of it is invoked as a rueful exclamation on the failings of the male sex ('Ah, men