Little Bighorn

(redirected from Battle of Little Bighorn)
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See also: National Parks and Monuments (table)National Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
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Little Bighorn,

river, c.90 mi (145 km) long, rising in the Bighorn Mts., N Wyo., and flowing north to join the Bighorn River in S Mont. On June 25–26, 1876, Sioux and Cheyenne warriors defeated the forces of Col. George CusterCuster, George Armstrong,
1839–76, American army officer, b. New Rumley, Ohio, grad. West Point, 1861. Civil War Service

Custer fought in the Civil War at the first battle of Bull Run, distinguished himself as a member of General McClellan's staff in the
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 in the Little Bighorn valley in Montana. The Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument (formerly Custer Battlefield National Monument) occupies the site of the battle. The graves of those killed in the battle are located around a granite monument marking the spot of Custer's "last stand." See National Parks and MonumentsNational Parks and Monuments

National Parks
Name Type1 Location Year authorized Size
acres (hectares)
Description
Acadia NP SE Maine 1919 48,419 (19,603) Mountain and coast scenery.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (table)

Bibliography

See N. Philbrick, The Last Stand (2010).

Little Bighorn

scene of General Ouster’s “last stand” (1876). [Am. Hist.: Van Doren, 274]
See: Defeat

Little Bighorn

a river in the W central US, rising in N Wyoming and flowing north to the Bighorn River. Its banks were the scene of the defeat (1876) and killing of General Custer and his command by Indians
References in periodicals archive ?
This June 25th will be the 135th anniversary of the Battle of Little Bighorn, otherwise known as Custer's Last Stand.
Recognized for his role in the Battle of Little Bighorn, this great Sioux warrior holds legendary status in our lore.
Calvary have long ago entered western legend with their hard fought demise at the Battle of Little Bighorn against overwhelming Native American forces in 1876.
Custer's $5,000 policy was written on June 4, 1874--two years and 21 days before Custer would lead his troops to their deaths at the infamous Battle of Little Bighorn.
This time, the craggy hero plays a cavalry officer accused of cowardice after missing the Battle of Little Bighorn while assigned elsewhere.
The following ornithological event was recorded by Grinnell as he accompanied Custer's exploration of the Black Hills, about 22 months before the battle of Little Bighorn (Greasy Grass).
Campbell played an important role in a controversy surrounding the name of the site of the battle of Little Bighorn, also known as Custer's Last Stand, maybe the best known example of the struggle between European settlers and Native Americans for control of North America.
Last June, on the 127th anniversary of the Battle of Little Bighorn, several Indian tribes, National Park Service officials, politicians, and park visitors gathered at the site of the Montana battlefield to dedicate an Indian Memorial adjacent to the long-standing monument to Lt.
On June 25, he achieved everlasting fame as an American legend when he was killed in combat when his beloved 7th Cavalry were massacred by a combined Sioux/Cheyenne force at the Battle of Little Bighorn.
The general died, along with hundreds of US Cavalrymen, at his famous 'Last Stand' during the Battle of Little Bighorn in 1876.
PHOTO (1) American Indians in full costume await their c ue during a re-enactment ceremony of the Battle of Little Bighorn on Saturday in southern Montana.
Suddenly, the Battle of Little Bighorn begins: 40 men dressed as members of the Seventh Cavalry, led by Custer (called "Yellow Hair" by the Sioux), gallop down from nearby hills to attack the Sioux and Northern Cheyenne.