Battle of the Spurs


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Spurs, Battle of the:

see Battle of the SpursBattle of the Spurs.
1 Fought in 1302 near Courtrai, Belgium, between the rebellious Flemish towns, led by Bruges, and an army sent by Philip IV of France, who had annexed Flanders in 1301. The French were totally defeated.
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Battle of the Spurs.

1 Fought in 1302 near Courtrai, Belgium, between the rebellious Flemish towns, led by Bruges, and an army sent by Philip IV of France, who had annexed Flanders in 1301. The French were totally defeated. The spurs taken from the fallen French knights formed so huge a trophy that they gave the battle its name. 2 Won in 1513 by the English under Henry VIII over the French, at Guinegate, N France. This second battle received its name possibly because of the speedy flight of the French cavalry.
References in periodicals archive ?
Offering a romanticized account of the Flemish victory over the French during the 1302 Battle of the Spurs, Conscience's novel is presumably the most important literary work of the Flemish Movement's symbolic and mythological repertory throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
In a similar epic way as the then popular historical novels of Walter Scott, Conscience (1812-1883) published De Leeuw van Vlaanderen, a novel about the so-called Battle of the Spurs in 1302.
De Leeuw van Vlaanderen, however, kept its place within collective memory as it had become a firmly fixed mythological point of reference and the Battle of the Spurs had become one of the strongest lieux de memoire of Flanders (for the concept of lieux de memoire see Nora).
With the help of Bethune, dressed in a suit of golden armor, the Flemish win the Battle of the Spurs.
For example, neither Breydel nor De Coninck (who was not the head of the weavers) participated in the Bruges Matins, and Bethune was imprisoned during the Battle of the Spurs.
While his appearance is decisive in winning the Battle of the Spurs, the golden knight does not reveal his identity and this is a suggestion of modesty.
At the end of the Battle of the Spurs, a grand religious procession takes place to thank god for the Flemish triumph.
For example, the film shows a low-angle shot of Breydel and some other Flemish characters who are preparing themselves for the Battle of the Spurs.
The clearest illustration of Claus's critical and ironic touch appears at the end of the film when the Flemish find the golden suit of armor of Bethune, who played a decisive role in winning the Battle of the Spurs.