Bearded Vulture


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Bearded Vulture

 

or lammergeier (Gypaëtus barbatus), a predatory bird of the hawk family. It has a length of up to 1.1 m and a wingspread of up to 2.7 m. The bird’s head and abdominal side are whitish or yellowish, and its back is blackish. Bristling feathers under the bill resemble a small beard (hence the bird’s name). The bearded vulture is found in the mountains of Asia, Africa, and southern Europe. In the USSR it is found in the Caucasus, Middle Asia, the Altai, and the Saians. It nests in cliff crevices and usually broods one egg at a time. The bearded vulture feeds on carrion, primarily bones. In Europe the numbers of bearded vultures are decreasing as the number of ungulates decreases.

References in periodicals archive ?
1) Bearded Vulture Study and Protection Group, Apdo.
We describe a case of reverse mounting in a polyandrous trio of Bearded Vultures (Gypaetus barbatus).
Between 2004 and 2005, we monitored a polyandrous trio of Bearded Vultures in the central Pre-Pyrenees mountains in Catalonia, northeastern Spain, during their courtship period (200 hr of observation).
Due to their physical and behavioral characteristics, it has been suggested that female Bearded Vultures can dominate males (see Negro et al.
Male-male copulations in polyandrous Bearded Vultures (Gypaetus barbatus): an unusual mating system in raptors.
The short and mid term survival of the bearded vulture in Spain is affected by three factors: firstly, its low population (fewer than 600 specimens); secondly, its highly restricted geographical distribution (the original population is limited to the Pyrenees, although bearded vultures are also being reintroduced to parts of Andalusia); and thirdly, its difficulty in successfully colonising new territory.
Identification of 15 bearded vulture reproduction areas;
Drafting of three Bearded Vulture Recuperation Plans;
Recovery of between three and six bearded vulture specimens per year from nests with low rates of reproduction;
The programme reveals its enormous influence on day-to-day living, how it has shaped Indian culture and religion, and why it attracts a vast array of wildlife including snow leopards, Asiatic brown bears and huge bearded vultures.