Beauharnais


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Related to Beauharnais: Joséphine de Beauharnais

Beauharnais

1. Alexandre , Vicomte de. 1760--94, French general, who served in the War of American Independence and the French Revolutionary wars; first husband of Empress Joséphine: guillotined
2. his son, Eugène de . 1781--1824, viceroy of Italy (1805--14) for his stepfather Napoleon I
3. (Eugénie) Hortense de . 1783--1837, queen of Holland (1806--10) as wife of Louis Bonaparte; daughter of Alexandre Beauharnais and sister of Eugène: mother of Napoleon III
4. Joséphine de . See (Empress) Josephine
References in periodicals archive ?
Beauharnais apparently wrote in October 1806 that Berthier needs to take care of the emperor and to ensure that Bonaparte does not expose himself too much, as he was one of his oldest friends and it is their attachment to the emperor that calmed her.
In its earliest case on the issue, Beauharnais, the Supreme Court
1796: Napoleon Bonaparte married Josephine de Beauharnais.
However, by the 1970s, the courts had narrowed Beauharnais into virtual nonexistence.
Like Tsarina Catherine II, her grandson Alexander I collected collections, amongst them that of Josephine de Beauharnais, the first wife of Napoleon Bonaparte.
THE French emperor penned a grovelling letter in March 1796 to his future wife, Josephine de Beauharnais, after a row.
THE French emperor's grovelling letter of March 1796 to his future wife, Josephine de Beauharnais, was written (originally in French) after a furious row the previous evening.
Instead, Talleyrand got his female friends--particularly Hortense de Beauharnais and Madame de Remusat--to help him out as usual, and within a week Napoleon had forgiven him.
What abruptly changed his mind and brought the third coalition into being was Napoleon's decision in 1804 to make Italy a kingdom and put himself on its throne, leaving the day-to-day running of the place to his stepson, Eugene Beauharnais.
With a green army, few supplies, and trapped between a treacherous Bonaparte in-law and the advancing Austrians, Eugene de Beauharnais, Napoleon's step-son, brilliantly executed three strategic retreats and ended the war not only highly regarded by his enemies, but technically undefeated.
He was far older than most of the rest and far less clearly qualified, but his current mistress was a great friend of Josephine de Beauharnais, the future Empress, whose circle he now belonged to: and Bonaparte no doubt found some diversion in his conversation as well as a use for his intelligence skills.