Beaux-Arts Classicism

Beaux-Arts Classicism

(1890–1920)
Grandiose compositions with exuberant ornamental detail and a variety of stone finishes characterize this style Classical colossal columns were grouped in pairs on projecting facades with enriched molding and free-standing statuary; pronounced cornices and enriched entablatures are topped with a tall parapet, balustrade, or attic story. It fostered an era of academic revivals, principally public buildings featuring monumental flights of steps.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In a way, it resembles the revolutionary utopia of the Centre Pompidou, designed by Renzo Piano, Richard Rogers and Gianfranco Franchini--a palace for the people, free from the strictures of Beaux-Arts Classicism.
Neo-Gothic, neo-Tudor, Beaux-Arts classicism, Art Nouveau: All had their brief moment before modernism crystallized (at least in the minds of the architectural establishment) as an "appropriate" aesthetic.
Up through the 1940s this was mostly a version of Classicism: Edwardian Baroque, Beaux-Arts Classicism, monumental stripped Classicism, or the fundamental Classicism of Gunnar Asplund.
By the time the building was finally completed in 1909 (after a second stage of construction), it was considered old-fashioned, as the taste had switched to a Beaux-Arts classicism that revered the regular and the expected.
He rightly points out that the rise of a Beaux-Arts classicism was not the only factor in Sullivan's decline, contrary to what Sullivan himself often claimed.