Bedlington terrier

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Bedlington terrier,

breed of long-legged, lithe terrierterrier,
classification used by breeders and kennel clubs to designate dogs originally bred to start small game and vermin from their burrows or, in the case of several breeds in this group, to go to earth and kill their prey. Today these dogs are raised chiefly as pets.
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 developed in the eastern Border districts of England in the 19th cent. It stands about 16 in. (40.6 cm) high at the shoulder and weighs from 22 to 24 lb (9.9–10.8 kg). Its thick, wiry outercoat is trimmed back to the fleecy undercoat for exhibition. The hair when trimmed is no longer than 1 in. (2.5 cm) on the body, absent on the ears except for a fringe on the tips, and, on the head, formed into a topknot that gradually tapers to the nose. The overall appearance when clipped for show resembles that of a sheep. In color the coat may be solid blue, liver, sandy, or any of these marked with tan. Most authorities believe the Bedlington was produced by crossing the old rough-coated terrier with the whippet. Originally raised to hunt vermin, badger, and fox, and often used in organized dogfights, the Bedlington was later taken into the home as companion and pet. See dogdog,
carnivorous, domesticated wolf (Canis lupus familiaris) of the family Canidae, to which the jackal and fox also belong. The family Canidae is sometimes referred to as the dog family, and its characteristics, e.g.
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