Beer's law


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Beer's law

[for August Beer], physical law stating that the quantity of light absorbed by a substance dissolved in a nonabsorbing solvent is directly proportional to the concentration of the substance and the path length of the light through the solutionsolution,
in chemistry, homogeneous mixture of two or more substances. The dissolving medium is called the solvent, and the dissolved material is called the solute. A solution is distinct from a colloid or a suspension.
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; the law is sometimes also referred to as the Beer-Lambert law or the Bouguer-Beer law. Beer's law is commonly written in the form Acl, where A is the absorbance, c is the concentration in moles per liter, l is the path length in centimeters, and ε is a constant of proportionality known as the molar extinction coefficient. The law is accurate only for dilute solutions; deviations from the law occur in concentrated solutions because of interactions between molecules of the solute, the substance dissolved in the solvent.

Beer's law

[′bā·ərz ‚lȯ]
(physical chemistry)
The law which states that the absorption of light by a solution changes exponentially with the concentration, all else remaining the same.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using the Omnic software and TQ Analyst program, calibration models based on simple Beer's law and partial least square (PLS) were optimized for the quantitative determination of total phenolic content in lemon samples.
Under the optimized conditions of the proposed method, Beer's law was obeyed in the concentration range 0.
The extremely high R value resulting from a controlled Beer's law calibration does not reflect the reality of a process measurement.
This indicates that Beer's law is valid in the concentration range 0.
The absorbed energy per leaf area unit was also estimated by using Beer's law with the extinction coefficient of coffee trees determined by the technique proposed by Ritchie (1972).
Compliance to Beer's Law is shown in Figure 2 (AL 5-10), where the same transmittance is obtained for the two measurement conditions:
The Beer's law relationship between T and LAI, and the extinction coefficient k, were determined (Eq.
STUDENT-CONSTRUCTED SPECTROMETERS FOR DEMONSTRATING BEER'S LAW.
Serial dilutions were then made, and a Beer's Law Plot was constructed to try to determine the concentration of ester remaining over time in the bacterial cultures.
From a Beer's Law calibration curve, which relates band absorbance to species concentration, the raw absorbance data were converted to concentration profiles.