Beerbohm


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Related to Beerbohm: Henry Maximilian Beerbohm

Beerbohm

Sir (Henry) Max(imilian). 1872--1956, English critic, wit, and caricaturist, whose works include Zuleika Dobson (1911), a satire on Oxford undergraduates
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There is something to be said, in connection with Beerbohm (that lasting tag "the incomparable Max" derives from his friendly enemy Bernard Shaw), for such journalistic bromides as "the best-known author you've never heard of.
Max Beerbohm, "Laughter," North American Review, Vol.
I don't make use of Elfenbein's theory of persuasive influence in this essay, primarily because I doubt very much that O'Connor thought her audience was sufficiently familiar with Beerbohm for her to engage with his writing in order to "argue" intertextually with him.
Artists as different as the iconoclastic young Max Beerbohm and the elderly President of the Royal Academy, Sir Frederick Leighton, were recruited; Oscar Wilde, however, was deliberately left out, possibly because Beardsley feared that Wilde's powerful personality would come to dominate "his" venture.
Others were ageing, but breathing still the same air as I breathed--Max Beerbohm, Arthur Symons, John Gray, W.
Also on display in the same room used by BMI's administrator, is a sketch signed by its subject, the English actor and theatre manager Mr H Beerbohm Tree (1852-1917) who had been playing Hamlet.
20) Moreover, in spite of their relative freedom, actresses worked in an environment dominated by a series of knighted actor-managers, notably Sir George Alexander, Sir Henry Irving, and Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree.
The drawings, particularly that of McLaren (Figure 9), owe a considerable historical debt to political cartoonists such as Gilray, and particularly to Honore Daumier and Max Beerbohm through their use of an exaggerated head and tiny body, but are also influenced by children's comic characters.
The poem was printed in Dwight Macdonald's Parodies: An Anthology from Chaucer to Beerbohm and After (Faber 8c Faber, 1960), to which she refers in Poetic Artifice (116) in relation to Swinburne's self-parody, "Nephilidia.
The first is the actor-manager Herbert Beerbohm Tree, who produced and starred in elaborately mounted revivals of Shakespeare's plays in the West End.
There were opportunities for drawing caricatures of fellow members, including Max Beerbohm, and for interacting with musical friends Duncan Tovey and Joseph Holbrooke.
Part 2 of the book describes Chesterton's growing years of fame: the early journalism and the remarkably sudden emergence as a celebrity caricatured by Max Beerbohm, debating with Bernard Shaw and meeting Joseph Conrad and Henry James, Winston Churchill and Lloyd George.