beet

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beet,

biennial or annual root vegetable of the family Chenopodiaceae (goosefootgoosefoot,
common name for the genus Chenopodium, as well as for the goosefoot family, Chenopodiaceae, a family of widely distributed shrubs and herbs that includes the beet, spinach, and mangel-wurzel.
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 family). The beet (Beta vulgaris) has been cultivated since pre-Christian times. Among its numerous varieties are the red, or garden, beet, the sugar beet, Swiss chard, and several types of mangel-wurzel and other stock feeds. Both the roots and the foliage of the red beet are edible, as is the foliage of Swiss chard and similar varieties. The easily stored roots of the mangel-wurzel [Ger.,=beet root] are much used for fodder in Europe and Canada and to a lesser extent in the United States. The biennial beet is often used in crop rotation. The foliage of the sugar beet and several other varieties is also used as feed. The sugar beet, cultivated commercially throughout the temperate zone, to which it is well adapted, provides about one third of the world's commercial sugar production; virtually all the rest comes from sugarcanesugarcane,
tall tropical perennials (species of Saccharum, chiefly S. officinarum) of the family Poaceae (grass family), probably cultivated in their native Asia from prehistoric times.
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. In the United States, sugar beets are grown extensively from Michigan to Idaho and in California, accounting for more than half of United States sugar production. Since the 18th cent. selective breeding has raised the root's sucrose content from 2% or 4% to 15% and even 20%. The extracted beet sucrose, dissolved in water, is refined and granulated, much like cane juice, to make sugar. Beets are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Caryophyllales, family Chenopodiaceae.
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beet

Good blood builder, rich in minerals, especially IRON*, great source of calcium, magnesium and selenium. Beet juice is rich in iron, sodium, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, sulphur, chlorine, iodine, copper, Vit A, B1, B2, B6, niacin. Juice has cancer-fighting properties, great for skin, gallbladder & liver. Juice or blend beet leaves for strong healing qualities.

beet

[bēt]
(botany)
Beta vulgaris. The red or garden beet, a cool-season biennial of the order Caryophyllales grown for its edible, enlarged fleshy root.

beet

1. any chenopodiaceous plant of the genus Beta, esp the Eurasian species B. vulgaris, widely cultivated in such varieties as the sugar beet, mangelwurzel, beetroot, and spinach beet
2. the leaves of any of several varieties of this plant, which are cooked and eaten as a vegetable
3. red beet the US name for beetroot
References in periodicals archive ?
Beet greens are high in vitamin A, and beet roots are a good source of vitamin C, manganese and folate.
Salad dishes include Beet Greens, Pear, and Maple Walnut Salad, and Arugula, Watercres: and Stoned-Fruit Salad with Jalapeno Vinaigrette.
Meanwhile, finely chop the beet greens (you should have a little over 1 cup), and set aside.
Beta-Carotene Food Sources Foods Beta-carotene Pumpkin, canned, 1 c 17,006 mcg Sweet potato, cooked, 1 med 13,120 mcg Spinach, cooked, 1c 11,317 mcg Kale, cooked, 1c 10,626 mcg Turnip greens, cooked, 1c 10,593 mcg Butternut squash, cooked, 1 c 9,369 mcg Collard greens, cooked, 1 cc 9,147 mcg Beet greens, cooked, 1 c 6,611 mcg Carrots, cooked, 1/2 c 6,500 mcg Chinese cabbage, cooked, 1 c 4,334 mcg Cantaloupe, cubed, 1 c 3,575 mcg Broccoli, cooked, 1/2 c 725 mcg Source: USDA; c=cup, mcg = microgram
Who knew that sheep will gobble down garlic scapes, scallion tops, carrot and beet greens, dahlias and marigolds?
Red onion in vinegar, from above Beets, from above Extra virgin olive oil to taste Toasted caraway seeds, crushed 1/2 cup creme fraiche 12 ounces smoked trout fillet Beet greens, from above Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste
Cooking Greens: Asian greens, beet greens, collards, kale, mustard greens, spinach, Swiss chard, turnip greens
A half-cup serving of cooked brocoli, beet greens, or kale has about 90 miligrams.
Buy the beets and get the beet greens (full of vitamin A) for free (rinse, chop and saute as you would chard).
Try Three-Potato Salad with Arugula or Roasted Beets and Fennel Salad with Beet Greens and Oranges.
Beet greens deliver significant amounts of vitamins A and C, along with some [B.