behaviouralism

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behaviouralism

or

behavioural approach

a theoretical and empirical approach within US POLITICAL SCIENCE which emphasizes the importance of sociological and psychological determinants of political actions and behaviour rather than confining attention, as is traditional in political science, to narrowly political processes, e.g. constitutional arrangements, legislative procedures. See POLITICAL BEHAVIOUR; compare BEHAVIOURISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
By 1963, behavioralist scholars could point to their field of study being ranked at the top within political science (Somit and Tanenhaus 1963, 941).
Judicial Behavioralists Test the "Legal Model" of Decision Making, 26 Law & Soc.
In the end, it is important to emphasize that the argument here is not against the behavioralist enterprise in general but rather against one particular well-cited result--status quo bias.
The training tends to distance you from [politics]," William McCallister, a political science professor at Barnard College, recalls of his education at the University of Chicago, still a behavioralist stronghold.
Behavioralists miss the point in chastising neoclassical economics for failing to account for observed irrationality or imperfect competition.
significant effect on behavior, the behavioralist school must still
And, the critics conclude, emphasis on the supposed political calculations of the justices in their decision making (the behavioralist approach) is in many ways unsound since it relies heavily on conjecture and flies in the face of much evidence to the contrary.
For anyone seeking insight into how a regulatory scheme might function in practice, these two, opposed behavioralist propositions pose a dilemma: How are we to predict whether a law will fortify or undermine people's internal motives?
We had to revisit the impact on families, colleagues, healthcare providers, behavioralists, program administrators and payors.
We also show what the behavioralists must be loath to mention.
Perhaps, behavioralists might argue, the profession would have developed better theories had it more closely followed the views of classical economist Alfred Marshall, who stated in his Principles of Economics (1871) that economics is "the study of men .
Guilhot has assembled an outstanding group of contributors, who prompt us to reconsider what we know about international relations theory and its relationship to "great debates" between realists and idealists and, later, traditionalists and behavioralists.