behaviour

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behaviour

(US), behavior
Psychol
a. the aggregate of all the responses made by an organism in any situation
b. a specific response of a certain organism to a specific stimulus or group of stimuli

behaviour

  1. the alteration, movement or response of any entity, person or system acting within a particular context.
  2. (PSYCHOLOGY) the externally observable response of an animal or human organism to an environmental stimulus (see also BEHAVIOURISM).
An important distinction is often made in sociology between automatic forms of behaviour described in 2 (e.g. jumping up after sitting on a drawing pin) and intended ACTION, where social meanings and purposes are also involved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although a strong communication culture may emerge from witnessing the behaviors of top management, research shows that offering rewards and incentives that acknowledge effective communication helps to strengthen and sustain that culture.
There is convincing evidence that parenting behaviors profoundly impact the development of positive behaviors and outcomes in youths and adolescents.
As a result, studies involving single-subject designs that show a particular treatment to be effective in changing behaviors must rely on replications across individuals if such results are to be found worthy of generalization.
It is often more effective in organizations to change the systems that influence people's behaviors, rather than attempting to change behaviors directly.
Health can also be defined in terms of health-promoting behaviors that a person may engage in.
The students were informed that they would be taught how to use the operant principles learned in the classroom to help reduce undesirable behaviors in the dogs, while increasing desirable behaviors.
The more salient an identity is, the more likely the behaviors associated with that identity will be enacted, and contexts will more likely be interpreted in relation to that identity.
So, to focus solely on behaviors that need improvement is to forget these differences.
The theories attribute deviant behavior to a multitude of spiritual, biological, and social factors.
To be effective, training programs should transcend traditional care safety topics and provide caregivers with the fundamental skills for preventing, minimizing, and managing challenging behaviors in the elderly.
The more important a role is to an individual the more he/she will commit to it, the stronger this commitment, the more salient the role is to his/her identity, and the more salient the role is to his/her identity, the more he/ she will engage in behaviors consistent with the role.