Behistun


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Behistun

, Bisitun, Bisutun
a village in W Iran by the ancient road from Ecbatana to Babylon. On a nearby cliff is an inscription by Darius in Old Persian, Elamite, and Babylonian describing his enthronement
References in periodicals archive ?
Zend, also known as Avestan, is an ancient Persian language most closely associated with Zoroastrianism, related to the Old Persian of the Behistun inscription, and more closely related to Vedic Sanskrit.
Kent, Old Persian [New Haven 1953], 129 and 132: Behistun inscription IV 60-61) A.
This last remark is based on the (original) Elamite version of Darius' Behistun inscription (Schmitt, Die altpersischen Inschriften, 82, sections 62- 63); the phrase "god of the Iranians" was dropped from the (later) Old Persian and Akkadian versions: Franz Heinrich Weissbach, Die KeiUnschriften der Achameniden (Leipzig 1911), 64-65; tr.
GREEK TEXT OMITTED] and the Persian term ba[n]daka of the Behistun inscription, the longest extant text of the Achaemenid kings, and the only one containing a historical narrative.
Rawlinson deciphered the Old Persian text of the Behistun inscription, the word ba[n]daka has been considered as being etymologically related to the PIE root *Bhendh-, 'bind',(26) and the phrase mana ba[n]daka(27) has been rendered as 'one of my subjects' or 'one of my servants',(28) 'my subject',(29) 'mein Diener',(30) 'my servant',(31) 'mon serviteur',(32) 'my slave',(33) and 'my vassal'.
It recounts King Khosrow's courtship of Princess Shirin, and the vanquishing of his love-rival, Farhad, by exiling Farhad to Behistun mountain with the impossible task of carving stairs out of the cliff rocks.
Hinz's erroneous translation of a paragraph (DB [section]70) of Darius's Behistun Inscription to maintain that it was this king who invented the Old Persian (OP) script.
He points out that Ansan appears once in the Behistun Inscription ([section]40), in connection with the revolt of a Persian army that had previously been in Ansan.
He uses the Behistun Inscription as an example of a text which is unreadable to any passerby, yet was copied and sent throughout the empire.
This is Lincoln's summary of the fate of the victims of Darius' reconstitution of the empire as related in the Behistun inscription.
Although this can be assumed a priori, since both verbs have similar roles and semantic ranges within their languages, it can also be verified to some degree by the Aramaic version of the Behistun inscription, which regularly has bd in place of kar- in the Old Persian original.
Rawlinson; the achievement was Edward Hincks' nearly alone, and was virtually completed well before Rawlinson published the Third Column of the Behistun inscription (Daniels 1993).