Belarusian language


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Belarusian language

or

White Russian:

see Russian languageRussian language,
also called Great Russian, member of the East Slavic group of the Slavic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Slavic languages). The principal language of administration in the former Soviet Union, Russian is spoken by about 170 million
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; Slavic languagesSlavic languages,
also called Slavonic languages, a subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. Because the Slavic group of languages seems to be closer to the Baltic group than to any other, some scholars combine the two in a Balto-Slavic subfamily of the Indo-European
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.
References in periodicals archive ?
Your Proposal must be expressed in the English, Russian or Belarusian language and valid for a minimum period of 90 days starting from the latest date of proposal s submission.
The Belarusian language is alive here, to which UNESCO has given status as an endangered language.
Public opinion polls show the reported use of Belarusian language (by 3 percent of respondents) to be almost twenty times lower than the use of Russian (57 percent), while 24 percent use a mixture of two languages and 16 percent use both.
Mort's poetry focuses on keeping the Belarusian language alive, despite many governmental attempts to absorb it into Russian.
This book is the slightly updated edition of Shirin Akiner's hitherto unpublished dissertation of 1980 on a manuscript in the Belarusian language but in Arabic script.
The British Library kitab is an interesting historical monument of the Belarusian language, with Polish interferences on phonological and lexical levels, and with Turkish loan words comprising roughly one-third of the religious vocabulary.
This theory emerged in the context of deficit of Belarusian language in public space of contemporary Belarus and could be interpreted as a kind of reterritorialization in order to support national feelings (13).
These often untitled and unpunctuated free-verse poems are bracketed by two poems that address the resurfacing of the Belarusian language.
His active role as an advocate for the Belarusian language during the decades of Russification in Belarus provoked the ire of numerous Soviet officials.
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