Bell's theorem

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Bell's theorem

[′belz ‚thir·əm]
(quantum mechanics)
A theorem which states that any hidden variable that satisifies the condition of locality cannot possibly reproduce all the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics, and which places upper limits, for the predictions of any such theory, on the strength of correlations between measurements of spatially separated objects, whereas quantum mechanics predicts very strong correlations between such measurements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though everyone has heard about Alexander Graham Bell's experiments in the 1870s that led to his 1876 application for a patent for his invention of the electromagnetic telephone (and indeed, Innocenzo Manzetti had introduced the idea of a "speaking telegraph" as early as 1844), it wasn't until the last two decades of the nineteenth century that the first fledgling metropolitan telephone switchboards came into being, and they faced all sorts of hurdles at the start.