Bell's theorem

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Bell's theorem

[′belz ‚thir·əm]
(quantum mechanics)
A theorem which states that any hidden variable that satisifies the condition of locality cannot possibly reproduce all the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics, and which places upper limits, for the predictions of any such theory, on the strength of correlations between measurements of spatially separated objects, whereas quantum mechanics predicts very strong correlations between such measurements.
References in periodicals archive ?
Teleportation, Bell's Inequalities and Inseparability, Physics Letters A, 222(12):2125, 1996b doi:10.
Bell's Inequalities Versus Teleportation: What is Non-locality?
Experimental test of Bell's inequalities using time-varying analyzers.
Utilizing time-varying angled analysers to maximize practical non-conformity to EPR locality and causality expectations, Aspect and his team claimed that the "results are in good agreement with quantum mechanical predictions" but most importantly "violate Bell's inequalities by 5 standard deviations.
Perhaps the most telling statement is that because quantum theory seems to tell us that particles do not have definite properties until measured, and the measurements inexplicably affect each other at a distance, "we can clearly see that the mind project[s] independent existence into the particles, but the experimental violation of Bell's Inequalities shows that nature refuses to accept the projection" (p.
NIST's experiments are the first to demonstrate violation of Bell's inequalities with massive particles ([9][Be.
Therefore the violation of Bell's inequalities, occurring when the probabilities of the local stochastic hidden variable theory are replaced by the QM probabilities, does not concern separability in the Howard sense (i.
From simple measurements of Planck's constant to testing violations of Bell's inequalities using entangled photons, Exploring Quantum Physics through Hands-on Projects not only immerses readers in the process of quantum mechanics, it provides insight into the history of the field how the theories and discoveries apply to our world not only today, but also tomorrow.
Experimental realization of Einstein-Podolski-Rosen-Bohm gedanken experiment; anew violation of Bell's inequalities.
Bell*locality and autonomy together entail Bell's inequalities, which are violated in experiments.
Honorable mentions: National Security Agency funding for superconducting supercomputer, demonstration of Bell's inequalities (fundamental advancement in quantum mechanics physics), and improved superconducting materials that allow superconductivity to take place at higher temperatures.
His paper is based on the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Paradox [5], a Bohm's paper [6], and Bell's Inequalities [7].