palsy

(redirected from Bell's palsy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

palsy:

see paralysisparalysis
or palsy
, complete loss or impairment of the ability to use voluntary muscles, usually as the result of a disorder of the nervous system. The nervous tissue that is injured may be in the brain, the spinal cord, or in the muscles themselves.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

palsy

[′pȯl·zē]
(medicine)
Any of various special types of paralysis, such as cerebral palsy.

palsy

Pathol
paralysis, esp of a specified type
References in periodicals archive ?
He said: "The procedure has already been established as safe but we need to prove it is effective with Bell's palsy.
I almost cried for joy when I was told that the GP in question, Dr Murkerjee, had actually had Bell's palsy herself - twice
A full HIV work-up should form part of the investigation of bilateral Bell's palsy.
2 million immunizations, showed a weak signal for both Bell's palsy and the blood disorders.
Serial gadoliniumenhanced magnetic resonance imaging and assessment of facial nerve function in Bell's palsy.
Some scientists believe it may protect bones, relieve Bell's Palsy, and combat chronic fatigue syndrome.
Chapters cover anatomy of the facial nerve, neurophysiology of the facial nerve and nerve regeneration, causes of facial palsy, testing of the facial nerve, Bell's palsy, facial palsy in infection, facial nerve in temporal bone fractures, iatrogenic injury of the facial nerve during surgery of chronic suppurative otitis media, facial nerve in the parotid gland, hemifacial spasms, syndromes associated with facial palsy, tumors causing facial palsy, plastic- surgical repair of the paralyzed face, facio-hypoglossal jump anastomoses for reanimation of the paralyzed face, and anesthesia for otologic surgery.
The aetiology of Bell's palsy is largely unknown, although it may be congenital, iatrogenic, or result from neoplasm, infection, neurovascular insult, trauma, or toxic exposure.
The effect of acupuncture on facial muscles was first understood centuries ago when specialists were treating Bell's palsy, a condition marked by a temporary sagging on one side of the face.
Although this specific vaccine has been withdrawn because of Bell's palsy cases associated with its administration, similar approaches may become more acceptable in the future if these safety issues can be resolved.