Bell's theorem

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Bell's theorem

[′belz ‚thir·əm]
(quantum mechanics)
A theorem which states that any hidden variable that satisifies the condition of locality cannot possibly reproduce all the statistical predictions of quantum mechanics, and which places upper limits, for the predictions of any such theory, on the strength of correlations between measurements of spatially separated objects, whereas quantum mechanics predicts very strong correlations between such measurements.
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He works through quantum interference, including observations of such phenomena as semi-transparent mirrors, interferometry, waves, dimensions and boundaries, and quantum key distribution, and then through quantum correlations, including distinguishability and its consequences, the Bell theorem, the theories of Schrodinger, Einstein, Podolski, and Rosen, the Aspect experiments, experimental metaphysics, and orthodox and not-so-orthodox explanations.