Bellingshausen Sea


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Bellingshausen Sea,

part of the S Pacific Ocean, W Antarctica, SW of Cape Horn between the Antarctic Peninsula and Amundsen Sea. The sea is named after Russian explorer Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen, who circumnavigated Antarctica in 1819. Major islands in the sea include Alexander I, Peter I (both named by Bellingshausen), and Charcot islands.

Bellingshausen Sea

 

the border sea of the Southern Ocean on the shores of Antarctica, between the Antarctic and Thurston peninsulas. Depth, from 410 to 4,470 m in the open sea. The shore is mountainous and bordered with shelf glaciers. The sea’s large islands are Peter I Island and Alexander I Land. The water temperature in the north is about 0° C; in the south, lower than - 1° C. In summer the salinity is approximately 33.5 parts per thousand. The currents move clockwise. The larger part of the sea’s surface is covered with floating sea ice and icebergs year-round; in the winter and spring months the entire surface of the sea is covered with ice. The sea was discovered by the Russian expedition of F. F. Bellingshausen and M. P. Lazarev in 1821.

Bellingshausen Sea

an area of the S Pacific Ocean off the coast of Antarctica
References in periodicals archive ?
IceBridge expanded its reach this year, covering a vast swath of Antarctica from the Ruppert Coast in West Antarctica to Recovery Glacier in the eastern half of the continent, plus the Weddell and Bellingshausen seas.
A positive anomaly then appeared in the Bellingshausen Sea and strengthened in later months of 2015 (Figs.
The 2015 atmospheric anomalies across Antarctica were dominated by below-average surface temperatures over much of coastal and interior Antarctica from January to September, particularly across the Antarctic Peninsula and the surrounding Weddell and Bellingshausen Seas.
Strong positive anomalies over the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas (between 150[degrees] and 75[degrees]W) in 2014 were weaker but remained positive in 2015.
2012a), and to sea ice loss in the Bellingshausen Sea (e.
Studies examining the impact of the ASL on Antarctic climate have focused on temperature and precipitation across West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula, as well as sea ice concentration in the Ross, Amundsen, and Bellingshausen Seas.
The large negative anomaly center in 2013 over the Drake Passage and the Bellingshausen Sea (between 45[degrees] and 120[degrees]W) is weaker and shifted to the Amundsen and Ross Seas in 2014.
As the seasons progressed from 2013 to 2014, the negative MSLP anomalies over the Ross Sea expanded into the Bellingshausen Sea and disappeared in spring of 2014 (see Fig.
In the South Pacific, a broad region of anomalous low surface pressure encompassed the Antarctic Peninsula and Bellingshausen Sea region, while a region of anomalous high surface pressure was present east of the Weddell Sea and centered along the Greenwich meridian (Fig.
However, the magnitudes of anomalies are increased but the extents were smaller compared to 2012, especially the negative anomalies over the Bellingshausen Sea (between 60[degrees] and 110[degrees]W).
Satellite observations show that several ice shelves on the Amundsen and Bellingshausen seas thinned between 2003 and 2008.