Benhadad

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Benhadad

(bĕnhā`dăd), in the Bible, kings of Damascus. 1 The son of Tabrimon, ally of AsaAsa
, in the Bible, king of Judah, son and successor of Abijah. He was a good king, zealous in his extirpation of idols. When Baasha of Israel took Ramah (a few miles N of Jerusalem), Asa bought the help of Benhadad of Damascus and recaptured Ramah. His son Jehoshaphat succeeded him.
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 of Judah against Baasha of Israel. 2 Probably the son and successor of (1,) leader of the coalition that withstood Shalmaneser III of Assyria at Karkar on the Orontes; he continued the traditional enmity of his kingdom with Israel and defeated AhabAhab
, d. c.853 B.C., king of Israel (c.874–c.853 B.C.), son and successor of Omri (1.) Ahab was one of the greatest kings of the northern kingdom. He consolidated the good foreign relations his father had fostered, and Israel was at peace during much of his reign.
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 and Jehoshaphat. He was murdered and succeeded by Hazael. 3 Son of Hazael and contemporary of Jehoash of Israel, who defeated him in war. He also was Assyria's vassal.
References in periodicals archive ?
35), told the king of Israel that he had forfeited his life because he (Ahab) did not kill the Aramean ruler Ben-Hadad, a statement reminiscent of Samuel's rebuke of King Saul (I Sam.
50) The Hebrew text in Kings belongs to the account of a war between King Ben-Hadad of Aram and King Ahab of Israel:
And Ben-Hadad the king of Aram gathered all his army, and there were thirty-two kings with him, and horses, and chariots; and he went up and besieged Samaria, making war on it.
In the biblical passage the demander is Ben-Hadad, the demandee is Ahab, and the object demanded is tribute (silver, gold, fairest wives, and children).
The incident involving Elisha the prophet and Ben-Hadad is often brought as a source in discussions regarding truth-telling to dying patients.
And Elisha came to Damascus, and Ben-Hadad, the king of Aram, was sick and it was told to him saying: "The man of God is come here.
The justification for such a lie, says Ralbag, is that if Ben-Hadad had been told the truth and then died, people might say that he died of fright.
Hadadezer of Damascus, as has been seen, was almost certainly the Ben-Hadad who had within the past three years launched and lost Aramaean Wars I and II against Israel, waged at about the same time Shalmaneser was battering Ahuni of Bit-Adini.
Ben-Hadad had equipped himself so lavishly for his first attack against Israel that he could not have expected that nation to be easy game: And Ben-Hadad, the king of Aram, gathered all his force .
One may reasonably suppose that, at Qarqara, Ahab fought with some of the very same warhorses, chariots, and weaponry that his pro tem ally Ben-Hadad had amassed for his failed attacks on Israel.
King Ahab (874-853 BCE) had to contend with a formidable adversary, King Ben-hadad II of Aram.
Thus, Ahab's career ends with a striking combination of heroic love for his nation and Divine punishment for his murder of Naboth and his lack of concern for his nation in sparing Ben-hadad.