Bence-Jones protein


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Bence-Jones protein

[¦bens ¦jōnz ¦prō‚tēn]
(pathology)
An abnormal group of globulins appearing in the serum and urine, usually in association with multiple myeloma and characterized by coagulation at 50-60°C.
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3% Laboratory results Positive M Band by serum protein 40 91% electrophoresis Urinary Bence-Jones protein 4 (28 tested) 14% Skeletal involvement Radiologically detectable 40 91% abnormalities Lytic lesions 35 80% Spine 25 71% Lumbosacral spine 24 69% Thoracic spine 12 34% Skull 23 66% Ribs 15 43% Long bones in and 12 34% Pelvis in 8 23% Clavicle in 4 11% Scapula 3 8.
8g/L, whereas the UPE showed Bence-Jones protein of 1.
Discovered more than 150 years ago, the Bence-Jones protein was the first recorded biological tumor marker.
Tumor markers have been part of the clinical laboratory since the discovery of Bence-Jones protein in 1846.
Multiple myeloma is characterized by excessive numbers of abnormal plasma cells in the bone marrow and overproduction of intact monoclonal immunoglobulin (IgG, IgA, IgD, or IgE) or Bence-Jones protein (free monoclonal light chains).
Stage Durie-Salmon Staging System I All of: Hemoglobin >10 g/dL Normal serum calcium Low concentration of M-protein (IgG <50 g/L, IgA <30 g/L, Bence-Jones protein <4 g/24hours) No bony lesions II Neither stage I nor stage III III Any of: Hemoglobin <8.
56 mg/dL, a monoclonal protein identified as IgA-[kappa] with an IgA level of 760 mg/dL, negative Bence-Jones protein in a 24-hour urine sample, and a normal cytogenetic study.
Urine protein electrophoresis and Bence-Jones protein measurements were negative.
The incidence and possible relevance of Bence-Jones protein in the sera of patients with multiple myeloma.