flexural rigidity

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flexural rigidity

[′flek·shə·rəl ri′jid·əd·ē]
(mechanics)
The ratio of the sideward force applied to one end of a beam to the resulting displacement of this end, when the other end is clamped.

flexural rigidity

A measure of stiffness of a structural member; the product of modulus of elasticity and moment of inertia divided by the length of the member.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bending stiffness of the three wire samples can be modeled by assumption of an annular homogeneous layer with a thickness equal to the wires (0.
The rear section of the truck Frame--measuring 42 mm higher than the on the GMT-800--features a fully boxed construction, which improves torsional stiffness by 234% and vertical bending stiffness by 64%.
In addition, to correlate the frictional properties with other related mechanical properties and the microstructure characteristics, as well as with the investigated process parameters, the shear stiffness, the bending stiffness, and compressional resilience of the different nonwoven fabrics were also measured using the corresponding Kawabata (KES) testers [33].
APPLICATION: Coating paper with chitosan, an abundant material, improves its bending stiffness and MD tensile strength.
Shear stiffness, vertical stiffness and bending stiffness of element rubber bearings were measured by using a combined loading test device.
As the only subflooring with an ESR certification, builders are assured that AdvanTech is the strongest panel based on critical design values, including bending stiffness and axial compression.
COC skin layers produce a film with high bending stiffness and good aesthetics that is still easy to handle when downgauged in a sleeve application process.
The maximum bending moment (M), bending stiffness (D), shear rigidity (U), and panel deflection (y) properties for each panel were then computed.
In the meantime, RADIOSS is used to analyse the torsion stiffness, bending stiffness, frontal offset loading and normal mode characteristics of the vehicle.
However, this idealisation is a purely theoretical concept, as in real structures such elements have a certain height of the cross-section and, consequently, a bending stiffness of a finite (not equal to zero) value (Furst et al.
The beam is characterized by length L and constant bending stiffness Ely.
This provides a 10% improvement in torsional rigidity and bending stiffness.