Bennett Island


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Bennett Island

 

an island in the De Long group, in the northern part of the East Siberian Sea. It has an area of about 150 sq km and a maximum elevation of 426 m. The shores are high and rocky. The island is covered with glaciers which are sliding into the sea. It was discovered in 1881 on an American expedition headed by De Long and is named after J. G. Bennett, who financed the expedition. Bennett Island is part of the Yakut ASSR.

References in periodicals archive ?
scientists have finally gathered hard evidence to explain the Bennett Island plumes, a mystery that remained unsolvable during the Cold War.
The Bennett Island plumes apparently result from airstreams passing over low mountains on the island, reports Russell C.
At the time, western investigators could not hope to visit Bennett Island to test their ideas.
It doesn't appear that methane leaks at Bennett Island are causing what we see," he says.
Instead, Schnell believes, the clouds form through a more prosaic process as air masses saturated with water vapor pass over the mountains on Bennett Island.
But the Bennett Island plumes have not yielded all their mystery.
and a number of other scientists think these continental mirages could have been large plumes rising from the sea--similar to clouds recently spotted on satellite images of Bennett Island, which lies 150 kilometers to the north of the New Siberian Islands.
These Bennett Island plumes were firstdiscovered in infrared images from National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration (NOAA) weather satellites.
9 Eos, Matson reports thatclouds similar to those above Bennett Island have been seen on satellite imagery of the northern of two islands called Novaya Zemlya, which lie about 2,000 kilometers to the west of Bennett Island.
Moreover, Soviet scientists who investigatedthe Bennett Island region after learning about the plumes, presumably from U.
scientists investigating the Bennett Island plumes have now settled on the methane theory, which was suggested by geologist James Clarke at the U.
Clarke suggests that as a result, pockets of methane gas build up near Bennett Island, and the methane is released explosively when a fault cracks through the overlying rocks and into the permafrost layer.