Byrhtnoth

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Byrhtnoth

(bĭrkht`nōth) or

Bryhtnoth

(brīkht`nōth), d. 991, alderman of the East Saxons. Leader of the English forces in the battle of MaldonMaldon
, town (1991 pop. 14,754) and district, Essex, E England, on the Blackwater estuary. Maldon is a market town with iron foundries and other small industries. The Maldon area has long been known for its sea salt; salt has been harvested there for more than 2000 years.
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, he was killed in the battle and was buried at Ely.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Tolkien takes a much more pessimistic view of the dragon fight in Beowulf in his essay on "Ofermod" appended to his alliterative verse radio play The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth (1953).
Tolkien's "The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son," a sequel to the poem to which editors have given the title "The Battle of Maldon," for example, is written entirely in what Tolkien, in his brief introduction to the poem or "recitation," called "a free form of the alliterative line," and a speech Tolkien assigned to Treebeard in The Two Towers provides an excellent example of Tolkien's alliterative style.
Beckman said for the non-Shakespeare piece he chose to perform "The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth," a short play written by J.
Tree and Leaf; Smith of Wootton Major; The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth.
These are The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son, "Leaf by Niggle," "The Lay of Aotrou and Itroun," "Imram," the poems of The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, Smith of Wootton Major, and "Bilbo's Last Song.
In this sense Tolkien's idea of the dyscatastrophic finds expression beyond "The Monsters and the Critics," in the 1953 dialogue poem "The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son," his commentary on the Anglo-Saxon fragment The Battle of Maldon, and the apparatus, foreword and afterword, with which it was published.
However, though Tolkien celebrates the ancient heroic model by recalling figures such as Beowulf and Beorhtnoth in valiant characters like Aragorn, he also uses The Lord of the Rings to show that these heroic ideals no longer have a place in modern society and in warfare after World War I.
Tolkien translated these lines in his short play The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son: "Heart shall be bolder, harder the purpose, / more proud the spirit as our power lessens
She shows how his thinking on Byrhtnoth's actions and the courage of his followers evolved, demonstrated through his fictional critiques in The Hobbit, The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorthelm's Son, and The Lord of the Rings.
Like Bullard, Peter Grybauskas also deals with the technique of narrative dualism--in this case, Tolkien's ability to hold two conflicting ways of thinking in creative tension, representing them through equally sympathetic characters each fairly having their own say, as he does in "The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son.
The key to recognizing the polyphonic aspects of The Lord of the Rings as well as its structural inheritance from the medieval poem lies in an intermediate step: Tolkien's "The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth," first published in a 1953 volume of Essays and Studies.
In Tree and Leaf: Including the Poem "Mythopoeia" [and] The Homecoming of Beorhtnoth Beorhthelm's Son.