Bergius


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Bergius

Friedrich (Karl Rudolph) . 1884-- 1949, German chemist, who invented a process for producing oil by high-pressure hydrogenation of coal: Nobel prize for chemistry 1931
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Since before the First World War German scientists had been perfecting methods of synthesizing various petroleum products from coal--first the Bergius process (1913), which yielded gasoline, then the Fischer-Tropsch process (1926), which could produce heavier fuels, such as diesel, but was more expensive than the Bergius process.
Fourteen Bergius and Fischer-Tropsch synthetic oil plants were operating, and an additional six were under construction, and more than a million tons of natural crude were being produced from domestic sources, much of it in the recently annexed territory of Austria.
Poaceae Bahia grasses Bergius Peltaea speciosa (Kunth) Malvaceae Slimy Standl.
In addition to the limited refined products based on crude oil, Germany in 1944 was producing liquid refined fuel from coal, using the Bergius hydrogenation process and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis process.
The Bergius process for direct conversion of coal to liquids was patented in 1913/1919 [3].
Bergius F, Specht H (1913) 'Die Anwendung hoher Drucke bei chemischen Vorgangen und eine Nachbildung des Entstehungsprozesses der Steinkhole.
The 'green coal' production process was first described in 1913 by the German chemist and Nobel laureate Friedrich Bergius, who used the stuff to make a synthetic fuel.
Bergius did attempt to establish a commercial hydrogenization facility at Rheinau during the period of 1915 to 1918, but technical start-up issues, along with Germany obtaining access to the Romanian oil fields resulted in minimizing the importance of converting coal to petroleum.
This is known as the "dynamic SOM" and will be discussed later (Kiviluoto and Bergius, 1998; Kasslin, Kangas, and Simula, 1992; Tryba, Metzen, and Goser, 1989).
In "Coal in Your Car's Tank," an article in the June 9 issue of THE NEW AMERICAN, science writer Ed Hiserodt described a more ambitious (and cleaner) way to derive energy from coal, turning it into liquid fuel using the proven direct liquefaction process developed by Nobel Laureate Friedrich Bergius.