Bergius


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Bergius

Friedrich (Karl Rudolph) . 1884-- 1949, German chemist, who invented a process for producing oil by high-pressure hydrogenation of coal: Nobel prize for chemistry 1931
References in periodicals archive ?
9) Hace referencia a Bent Bergius (1723-1784), naturalista sueco discipulo de Lineo.
Nevertheless, the transportation crisis might have affected production at the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and Bergius hydrogenation plants.
Material examinado LPC Sitio Tipo de muestra Fecha 9938 Cienaga de Paticos Epifiton en Eichhornia 01/03/2007 azurea (Swartz) Kunth 9943 Cienaga de Ayapel Epifiton en Paspalum 01/09/2006 repens Bergius 9944 Cienaga de Paticos Epifiton en Utricularia 01/08/2006 repens Bergius 9953 Cienaga de Playa Epifiton en Eichhornia 01/12/2006 Blanca crassipes (Martius) Solms-Laubach 9969 Cienaga de Ayapel Epifiton en Eichhornia 01/01/2008 crassipes (Martius) Solms-Laubach 9972 Quebrada Quebradona Epifiton en Eichhornia 01/09/2006 heterosperma Alexander 9975 Cano Barro Epifiton en Eichhornia 01/09/2006 heterosperma Alexander 9976 Cienaga de La Miel Epifiton en Eichhornia 01/08/2006 heterosperma Alexander
Bergius F, Specht H (1913) 'Die Anwendung hoher Drucke bei chemischen Vorgangen und eine Nachbildung des Entstehungsprozesses der Steinkhole.
making it from coal through the Fischer-Tropsch or the Bergius or the
The 'green coal' production process was first described in 1913 by the German chemist and Nobel laureate Friedrich Bergius, who used the stuff to make a synthetic fuel.
Bergius did attempt to establish a commercial hydrogenization facility at Rheinau during the period of 1915 to 1918, but technical start-up issues, along with Germany obtaining access to the Romanian oil fields resulted in minimizing the importance of converting coal to petroleum.
This is known as the "dynamic SOM" and will be discussed later (Kiviluoto and Bergius, 1998; Kasslin, Kangas, and Simula, 1992; Tryba, Metzen, and Goser, 1989).
In "Coal in Your Car's Tank," an article in the June 9 issue of THE NEW AMERICAN, science writer Ed Hiserodt described a more ambitious (and cleaner) way to derive energy from coal, turning it into liquid fuel using the proven direct liquefaction process developed by Nobel Laureate Friedrich Bergius.
For more on Grosz and the comic grotesque, see Hanne Bergius, "Dada Grotesque," in Comic Grotesque: Wit and Mockery in German Art, 1870-1940, ed.