Bergius process


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Bergius process

[′ber·gē·əs ′präs·əs]
(chemical engineering)
Treatment of carbonaceous matter, such as coal or cellulosic materials, with hydrogen at elevated pressures and temperatures in the presence of a catalyst, to form an oil similar to crude petroleum. Also known as coal hydrogenation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Bergius process for direct conversion of coal to liquids was patented in 1913/1919 [3].
The bulk of pollutants created from direct liquefaction, the Bergius process, are created in the making of hydrogen for the process, but the creation of these pollutants can be largely avoided by separating the hydrogen with heat from a new generation of super-safe nuclear reactors.
The use of fuming acid (HCL gas) in the Bergius process ensures high yields, but the costs of recovery and reconcentration of the HCL has made the process costs too high for economic viability - until now.
Originally developed around the Bergius process (concentrated hydrochloric acid hydrolysis of biomass), the CASE process achieves the highest yields in the industry, and produces high purity fractions of sugars and lignin.